Streptococcus pyogenes prtFII, but not sfbI, sfbII or fbp54, is represented more frequently among invasive-disease isolates of tropical Australia

Delvecchio, A., Currie, B. J., McArthur, J. D., Walker, M. J. and Sriprakash, K. S. (2002) Streptococcus pyogenes prtFII, but not sfbI, sfbII or fbp54, is represented more frequently among invasive-disease isolates of tropical Australia. Epidemiology and Infection, 128 3: 391-396. doi:10.1017/S0950268802006787


Author Delvecchio, A.
Currie, B. J.
McArthur, J. D.
Walker, M. J.
Sriprakash, K. S.
Title Streptococcus pyogenes prtFII, but not sfbI, sfbII or fbp54, is represented more frequently among invasive-disease isolates of tropical Australia
Journal name Epidemiology and Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0950-2688
1469-4409
Publication date 2002-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0950268802006787
Volume 128
Issue 3
Start page 391
End page 396
Total pages 6
Editor N. Noah
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 321202 Epidemiology
730212 Disease distribution and transmission
Abstract Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) strains may express several distinct fibronectin-binding proteins (FBPs) which are considered as major streptococcal adhesins. Of the FBPs, SfbI was shown in vitro to promote internalization of the bacterium into host cells and has been implicated in persistence. In the tropical Northern Territory, where group A streptococcal infection is common, multiple genotypes of the organism were found among isolates from invasive disease cases and no dominant strains were observed. To determine whether any FBPs is associated with invasive disease propensity of S. pyogenes, we have screened streptococcal isolates from bacteraemic and necrotizing fasciitis patients and isolates from uncomplicated infections for genetic endowment of 4 FBPs. No difference was observed in the distribution of sfbII, fbp54 and sfbI between the blood isolates' and isolates from uncomplicated infection. We conclude that the presence of sfbI does not appear to promote invasive diseases, despite its association with persistence. We also show a higher proportion of group A streptococcus strains isolated from invasive disease cases possess prtFII when compared to strains isolated from non-invasive disease cases. We suggest that S. pyogenes may recruit different FBPs for different purposes.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Infectious Diseases
Fibronectin-binding Protein
Group-a Streptococci
Serum Opacity Factor
Shock-like Syndrome
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 18 July 2002

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:55:24 EST