Eating ethically: Emmanuel Levinas and Simone Weil (Exploring the ethical realms of anorexia and so-called states of grace)

Walker, M. B. (2002) Eating ethically: Emmanuel Levinas and Simone Weil (Exploring the ethical realms of anorexia and so-called states of grace). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, 76 2: 295-320.

Author Walker, M. B.
Title Eating ethically: Emmanuel Levinas and Simone Weil (Exploring the ethical realms of anorexia and so-called states of grace)
Journal name American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1051-3558
Publication date 2002-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 76
Issue 2
Start page 295
End page 320
Total pages 26
Editor Robert E. Wood
Place of publication Charlottesvile USA
Publisher Philosophical Documentation Center
Language eng
Subject C1
440104 Applied Ethics (incl. Bioethics and Environmental Ethics)
780199 Other
Abstract Emmanuel Levinas's work on the ethical responsibility of the face-to-face relation offers an illuminating context or clearing within which we might better appreciate the work of Simone Weil. Levinas's subjectivity of the hostage, the one who is responsible for the other before being responsible for the self, provides us with a way of re-encountering the categories of gravity and grace invoked in Weil's original account. In this paper I explore the terrain between these thinkers by raising the question of eating as, in part, an ethical act. Weil's conception of grace refers to the state of decreation in which the utter humility of the self moves toward a kind of disintegration and weightlessness. this weightlessness, which Weil contrasts to the gravity of terrestrial weight, might be thought of in terms of the subject's fundamental responsibility for the other, especially in terms of the injunction Thou shalt neither kill nor take the food of thy neighbour. Taking the place of the other, taking the food from the mouth of the other, is the ethical dilemma facing the subject as hostage and an elaboration of this situation may provide us with steps toward a radical questioning of anorexia as - at least in part - an ethical rather than purely medical condition.
Keyword Philosophy
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:53:37 EST