Knowledge of the national emergency telephone number and prevalence and characteristics of those trained in CPR in Queensland: baseline information for targeted training interventions

Clark, Michele J., Enraght-Moony, Emma, Balanda, Kevin P., Lynch, Michele, Tighe, Trevor and FitzGerald, Gerry (2002) Knowledge of the national emergency telephone number and prevalence and characteristics of those trained in CPR in Queensland: baseline information for targeted training interventions. Resuscitation, 53 1: 63-69. doi:10.1016/S0300-9572(01)00486-5


Author Clark, Michele J.
Enraght-Moony, Emma
Balanda, Kevin P.
Lynch, Michele
Tighe, Trevor
FitzGerald, Gerry
Title Knowledge of the national emergency telephone number and prevalence and characteristics of those trained in CPR in Queensland: baseline information for targeted training interventions
Journal name Resuscitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-9572
Publication date 2002-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0300-9572(01)00486-5
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 53
Issue 1
Start page 63
End page 69
Total pages 7
Editor P. Baskett
Place of publication The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier/North-Holland
Language eng
Subject C1
321216 Health Promotion
730301 Health education and promotion
Abstract Members of the community contribute to survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by contacting emergency medical services and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) prior to the arrival of an ambulance. In Australia there is a paucity of information of the extent that community members know the emergency telephone number and are trained in CPR. A survey of Queensland adults (n = 4490) was conducted to ascertain current knowledge and training levels and to target CPR training. Although most respondents (88.3%) could state the Australian emergency telephone number correctly, significant age differences were apparent (P < 0.001). One in five respondents aged 60 years and older could not state the emergency number correctly. While just over half the respondents (53.9%) had completed some form of CPR training, only 12.1% had recent training. Older people were more likely to have never had CPR training than young adults. Additional demographic and socio-economic differences were found between those never trained in CPR and those who were. The results emphasise the need to increase CPR training in those aged 40 and over, particularly females, and to increase the awareness of the emergency telephone number amongst older people. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Critical Care Medicine
Emergency Medicine
Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (cpr)
Bystander Cpr
Emergency Medical Services
Improving Survival
Cardiac-arrest
Community
Citizens
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:40:52 EST