Survival following mechanical ventilation of recipients of bone marrow transplants and peripheral blood stem cell transplants

Scott, P.H., Morgan, T.J., Durrant, S. and Boots, R.J. (2002) Survival following mechanical ventilation of recipients of bone marrow transplants and peripheral blood stem cell transplants. Anaesthesia And Intensive Care, 30 3: 289-294.


Author Scott, P.H.
Morgan, T.J.
Durrant, S.
Boots, R.J.
Title Survival following mechanical ventilation of recipients of bone marrow transplants and peripheral blood stem cell transplants
Journal name Anaesthesia And Intensive Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0310-057X
Publication date 2002-01-01
Year available 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 30
Issue 3
Start page 289
End page 294
Total pages 6
Editor J. G. Roberts
A. W. Duncan
et al.
Place of publication Edgecliff, New South Wales
Publisher Australian Society of Anaesthetists
Language eng
Subject C1
321008 Haematology
730103 Blood disorders
Abstract Survival of bone marrow transplant recipients requiting mechanical ventilation is poor but improving. This study reports a retrospective audit of all haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients requiring mechanical ventilation at an Australian institution over a period spanning 11 years from 1988 to 1998. Recipients of autologous transplants are significantly less likely to require mechanical ventilation than recipients of allogeneic transplants. Of 50 patients requiring mechanical ventilation, 28% survived to discharge from the intensive care unit, 20% to 30 days post-ventilation, 18% to discharge from hospital and 12% to six months post-ventilation. Risk factors for mortality in the HSCT recipient requiting mechanical ventilation include renal, hepatic and cardiovascular insufficiency and greater severity of illness. Mechanical ventilation of HSCT recipients should not be regarded as futile therapy.
Keyword Anesthesiology
Critical Care Medicine
Transplantation
Intensive-care Unit
Respiratory-failure
Prognostic Factors
Support
Complications
Admission
Cancer
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 03:58:51 EST