Can motivational signs prompt increases in incidental physical activity in an Australian health-care facility?

Marshall, A., Bauman, A., Patch, C., Wilson, J. and Chen, J. (2002) Can motivational signs prompt increases in incidental physical activity in an Australian health-care facility?. Health Education Research, 17 6: 743-749. doi:10.1093/her/17.6.743


Author Marshall, A.
Bauman, A.
Patch, C.
Wilson, J.
Chen, J.
Title Can motivational signs prompt increases in incidental physical activity in an Australian health-care facility?
Journal name Health Education Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0268-1153
Publication date 2002-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/her/17.6.743
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 17
Issue 6
Start page 743
End page 749
Total pages 7
Editor K. Tones
J. R. Sorenson
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
321216 Health Promotion
730299 Public health not elsewhere classified
Abstract This study aimed to evaluate whether a stair-promoting signed intervention could increase the use of the stairs over the elevator in a health-care facility. A time-series design was conducted over 12 weeks. Data were collected before, during and after displaying a signed intervention during weeks 4-5 and 8-9. Evaluation included anonymous counts recorded by an objective unobtrusive motion-sensing device of people entering the elevator or the stairs. Self-report data on stair use by hospital staff were also collected. Stair use significantly increased after the first intervention phase (P = 0.02), but after the intervention was removed stair use decreased back towards baseline levels. Moreover, stair use did not significantly change after the re-introduction of the intervention. Lastly, stair use decreased below the initial baseline level during the final weeks of evaluation. Furthermore, there was no significant change in self-reported stair use by hospital staff. Therefore, the signed intervention aimed at promoting an increase in incidental physical activity produced small brief effects, which were not maintained. Further research is required to find more effective 'point of choice' interventions to increase incidental physical activity participation with more sustainable impact.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 03:58:33 EST