Genetic consequences of sequential founder events by an island-colonizing bird

Clegg, S. M., Degnan, S. M., Kikkawa, J., Moritz, C.C., Estoup, A. and Owens, I. P. (2002) Genetic consequences of sequential founder events by an island-colonizing bird. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 99 12: 8127-8132. doi:10.1073/pnas.102583399


Author Clegg, S. M.
Degnan, S. M.
Kikkawa, J.
Moritz, C.C.
Estoup, A.
Owens, I. P.
Title Genetic consequences of sequential founder events by an island-colonizing bird
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
Publication date 2002-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.102583399
Volume 99
Issue 12
Start page 8127
End page 8132
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC 20418 USA
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Language eng
Subject C1
270709 Biogeography
779903 Living resources (flora and fauna)
06 Biological Sciences
Abstract The importance of founder events in promoting evolutionary changes on islands has been a subject of long-running controversy. Resolution of this debate has been hindered by a lack of empirical evidence from naturally founded island populations. Here we undertake a genetic analysis of a series of historically documented, natural colonization events by the silvereye species-complex (Zosterops lateralis), a group used to illustrate the process of island colonization in the original founder effect model. Our results indicate that single founder events do not affect levels of heterozygosity or allelic diversity, nor do they result in immediate genetic differentiation between populations. Instead, four to five successive founder events are required before indices of diversity and divergence approach that seen in evolutionarily old forms. A Bayesian analysis based on computer simulation allows inferences to be made on the number of effective founders and indicates that founder effects are weak because island populations are established from relatively large flocks. Indeed, statistical support for a founder event model was not significantly higher than for a gradual-drift model for all recently colonized islands. Taken together, these results suggest that single colonization events in this species complex are rarely accompanied by severe founder effects, and multiple founder events and/or long-term genetic drift have been of greater consequence for neutral genetic diversity.
Keyword Ecology
Islands
Silvereyes
Colonization
Microsatellites
Population Bottlenecks
Average Heterozygosity
Microsatellite Loci
Speciation
Evolution
Differentiation
Distance
Conservation
Chaffinches
Revolutions
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 03:25:56 EST