The global epidemiology and disease burden of cannabis use and dependence

Degenhardt, L., Ferrari, A. J. and Hall, W. D. (2017). The global epidemiology and disease burden of cannabis use and dependence. In Victor R. Preedy (Ed.), Handbook of cannabis and related pathologies: biology, pharmacology, diagnosis, and treatment (pp. 89-100) London: Academic Press. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-800756-3.00011-9


Author Degenhardt, L.
Ferrari, A. J.
Hall, W. D.
Title of chapter The global epidemiology and disease burden of cannabis use and dependence
Title of book Handbook of cannabis and related pathologies: biology, pharmacology, diagnosis, and treatment
Place of Publication London
Publisher Academic Press
Publication Year 2017
Sub-type Chapter in reference work, encyclopaedia, manual or handbook
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-800756-3.00011-9
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISBN 9780128008270
9780128007563
Editor Victor R. Preedy
Volume number 1
Chapter number 10
Start page 89
End page 100
Total pages 12
Total chapters 14
Abstract/Summary This chapter discusses the estimated prevalence of cannabis dependence and its contribution to the global burden of disease. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 estimated that there were an estimated 13.1 million cannabis dependent people globally in 2010 (point prevalence 0.19%). Prevalence peaked between 20 and 24 years, was higher in males than females, and in high income regions. Cannabis dependence accounted for 2 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) globally in 2010; a 22% increase in crude DALYs since 1990 largely due to population growth. Countries with statistically higher age-standardized DALY rates included the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western European countries; those with lower rates were from Sub-Saharan Africa West, and Latin America. Regular cannabis use as a risk factor for schizophrenia accounted for an estimated 7000 DALYs globally. Cannabis dependence is a disorder primarily experienced by young adults, especially in higher income countries. Our estimates suggest that cannabis use as a risk factor for schizophrenia is not a major contributor to population-level disease burden.
Keyword Cannabis
Dependence
Burden of disease
Epidemiology
Schizophrenia
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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