Antibacterial nerol cinnamates from the Australian plant Eremophila longifolia

Galappathie, Savithri, Edwards, David J., Elliott, Alysha G., Cooper, Matthew A., Palombo, Enzo A., Butler, Mark S. and Mahon, Peter J. (2017) Antibacterial nerol cinnamates from the Australian plant Eremophila longifolia. Journal of Natural Products, 80 4: 1178-1181. doi:10.1021/acs.jnatprod.6b00888


Author Galappathie, Savithri
Edwards, David J.
Elliott, Alysha G.
Cooper, Matthew A.
Palombo, Enzo A.
Butler, Mark S.
Mahon, Peter J.
Title Antibacterial nerol cinnamates from the Australian plant Eremophila longifolia
Formatted title
Antibacterial nerol cinnamates from the Australian plant Eremophila longifolia
Journal name Journal of Natural Products   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1520-6025
0163-3864
Publication date 2017-04-28
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.6b00888
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 80
Issue 4
Start page 1178
End page 1181
Total pages 4
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Subject 1602 Analytical Chemistry
1313 Molecular Medicine
3004 Pharmacology
3003 Pharmaceutical Science
3002 Drug Discovery
2707 Complementary and alternative medicine
1605 Organic Chemistry
Abstract Two new antimicrobial agents, neryl ferulate (1) and neryl p-coumarate (2), were identified using bioassay-guided isolation from the leaves of Eremophila longifolia, which is a medicinal plant used by some Australian Aboriginal communities. Although gradual autoxidation of the nerol subunit hindered the initial attempts to purify and characterize 1 and 2, it was found that the autoxidation could be stopped through storage under argon at −20 °C. Biological evaluation showed that neryl ferulate (1) had moderate activity against various Gram-positive bacteria, while neryl p-coumarate (2) was active only against Enterococcus faecium.
Formatted abstract
Two new antimicrobial agents, neryl ferulate (1) and neryl p-coumarate (2), were identified using bioassay-guided isolation from the leaves of Eremophila longifolia, which is a medicinal plant used by some Australian Aboriginal communities. Although gradual autoxidation of the nerol subunit hindered the initial attempts to purify and characterize 1 and 2, it was found that the autoxidation could be stopped through storage under argon at −20 °C. Biological evaluation showed that neryl ferulate (1) had moderate activity against various Gram-positive bacteria, while neryl p-coumarate (2) was active only against Enterococcus faecium.
Keyword Plant Sciences
Chemistry, Medicinal
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Plant Sciences
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID HHSN272200700055C
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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