Reactions to tick antitoxin serum and the role of atropine in treatment of dogs and cats with tick paralysis caused by Ixodes holocyclus: a pilot survey

Atwell, R. B. and Campbell, F. E. (2001) Reactions to tick antitoxin serum and the role of atropine in treatment of dogs and cats with tick paralysis caused by Ixodes holocyclus: a pilot survey. Australian Veterinary Journal, 79 6: 394-397. doi:10.1111/j.1751-0813.2001.tb12980.x


Author Atwell, R. B.
Campbell, F. E.
Title Reactions to tick antitoxin serum and the role of atropine in treatment of dogs and cats with tick paralysis caused by Ixodes holocyclus: a pilot survey
Journal name Australian Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0423
Publication date 2001-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2001.tb12980.x
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 79
Issue 6
Start page 394
End page 397
Total pages 4
Editor Maureen Revington
Place of publication Brunswick, Victoria
Publisher Australian Veterinary Association
Language eng
Subject C1
300512 Pharmacology
670503 Treatments (e.g. chemicals, antibiotics)
Abstract Objective To determine the incidence and nature of adverse reactions of dogs and cats to tick antitoxin serum and to re-evaluate the role of atropine in the treatment of tick paralysis. Design A retrospective questionnaire of veterinarians. Procedure Questionnaires were posted to 320 veterinarians in tick-endemic regions of Australia. Questions referred to dogs and cats treated for tick paralysis over a period of three years: the number treated, treatment protocols and adverse systemic reactions to tick antitoxin serum. Ninety completed questionnaires were returned and responses analysed. Results Veterinarians reported that approximately 3% of dogs exhibited adverse reactions immediately following treatment with tick antitoxin serum, Eighteen percent of these reactions were described as anaphylaxis, with the remaining 82% attributed to the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Six percent of cats treated with tick antitoxin serum reacted adversely and the majority of reactions (63%) were ascribed to the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Atropine was used routinely by 10% of responding veterinarians in the treatment of dogs and cats with tick paralysis. A similar number of veterinarians used atropine only in selected cases. Most veterinarians (76%) reported that they never used atropine in the treatment of tick paralysis in either dogs or cats. Within the survey population, premedication with atropine reduced the number of Bezold-Jarisch reactions following tick antitoxin administration approximately five-fold in dogs and four-fold in cats. Conclusions Data from this pilot survey indicate that more cats than dogs have adverse systemic reactions to tick antitoxin serum and that the majority of these reactions in both dogs and cats could be related to the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. The number of reactions to tick antitoxin serum in dogs and cats could be significantly reduced by the routine use of atropine prior to administration of tick antitoxin serum.
Keyword Tick Antitoxin
Tick Paralysis
Veterinary Sciences
Bezold-jarisch Reflex
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 02:20:19 EST