A total-evidence phylogeny of ticks provides insights into the evolution of life cycles and biogeography

Murrell, A., Campell, N. J. H. and Barker, S. C. (2001) A total-evidence phylogeny of ticks provides insights into the evolution of life cycles and biogeography. Molecular Phylogenetics And Evolution, 21 2: 244-258. doi:10.1006/mpev.2001.1018


Author Murrell, A.
Campell, N. J. H.
Barker, S. C.
Title A total-evidence phylogeny of ticks provides insights into the evolution of life cycles and biogeography
Journal name Molecular Phylogenetics And Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1055-7903
Publication date 2001-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1006/mpev.2001.1018
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 21
Issue 2
Start page 244
End page 258
Total pages 15
Place of publication San Diego, USA
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject C1
270208 Molecular Evolution
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract We inferred the phylogeny of 33 species of ticks from the subfamilies Rhipicephalinae and Hyalomminae from analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA and morphology. We used nucleotide sequences from 12S rRNA, cytochrome c oxidase I, internal transcribed spacer 2 of the nuclear rRNA, and 18S rRNA. Nucleotide sequences and morphology were analyzed separately and together in a total-evidence analysis. Analyses of the five partitions together (3303 characters) gave the best-resolved and the best-supported hypothesis so far for the phylogeny of ticks in the Rhipicephalinae and Hyalomminae, despite the fact that some partitions did not have data for some taxa. However, most of the hidden conflict (lower support in the total-evidence analyses compared to that in the individual analyses) was found in those partitions that had taxa without data. The partitions with complete taxonomic sampling had more hidden support (higher support in the total-evidence analyses compared to that in the separate-partition analyses) than hidden conflict. Mapping of geographic origins of ticks onto our phylogeny indicates an African origin for the Rhipicephalinae sensu lato (i.e., including Hyalomma spp.), the Rhipicephalus-Boophilus lineage, the Dermacentor-Anocentor lineage, and the Rhipicephalus-Booophilus-Nosomma-Hyalomma-Rhipicentor lineage. The Nosomma-Hyalomma lineage appears to have evolved in Asia. Our total-evidence phylogeny indicates that (i) the genus Rhipicephalus is paraphyletic with respect to the genus Boophilus, (ii) the genus Dermacentor is paraphyletic with respect to the genus Anocentor, and (iii) some subgenera of the genera Hyalomma and Rhipicephalus are paraphyletic with respect to other subgenera in these genera. Study of the Rhipicephalinae and Hyalomminae over the last 7 years has shown that analyses of individual datasets (e.g., one gene or morphology) seldom resolve many phylogenetic relationships, but analyses of more than one dataset can generate well-resolved phylogenies for these ticks. (C) 2001 Academic Press.
Keyword Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Evolutionary Biology
Genetics & Heredity
16s Rdna Sequences
Ribosomal-rna
Hard Ticks
Rhipicephaline Ticks
Metastriata Acari
Mitochondrial 12s
Data Sets
Ixodidae
Taxa
DNA
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 62 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 62 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 02:09:41 EST