Volunteerism and government policy in infant welfare in Queensland, Australia, 1931-1961: Working round the ban

Thorley, Virginia (2001) Volunteerism and government policy in infant welfare in Queensland, Australia, 1931-1961: Working round the ban. International Journal of Self-Help and Self-Care, 1 4: 345-352.

Author Thorley, Virginia
Title Volunteerism and government policy in infant welfare in Queensland, Australia, 1931-1961: Working round the ban
Journal name International Journal of Self-Help and Self-Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1091-2851
1541-4450
Publication date 2001-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 1
Issue 4
Start page 345
End page 352
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amityville, NY, United States
Publisher Baywood
Language eng
Subject CX
430101 History - Australian
780199 Other
Abstract Whereas in other Australian states voluntary organizations set up and managed infant health clinics and state governments only later became involved, in order to resolve conflicts or raise standards, Queensland began with government control. From the start, these well-baby clinics were established and maintained by the state government, whose policy precluded any involvement by the voluntary sector in baby clinic management or other aspects of the work of the Maternal and Child Welfare section of the Department of Health and Home Affairs. One organization, the Mothercraft Association of Queensland, attempted to contribute to maternal-infant welfare in the years 1931-1961. This article will discuss how the association worked in a way that was complementary to the government's work, and non-confrontationist, to achieve some of its goals.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 02:08:48 EST