The effects of particle size, shape, density and flow characteristics on particle margination to vascular walls in cardiovascular diseases

Ta, Hang Thu, Truong, Nghia P., Whittaker, Andrew K., Davis, Thomas P. and Peter, Karlheinz (2017) The effects of particle size, shape, density and flow characteristics on particle margination to vascular walls in cardiovascular diseases. Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery, 15 1: 33-45. doi:10.1080/17425247.2017.1316262

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Author Ta, Hang Thu
Truong, Nghia P.
Whittaker, Andrew K.
Davis, Thomas P.
Peter, Karlheinz
Title The effects of particle size, shape, density and flow characteristics on particle margination to vascular walls in cardiovascular diseases
Journal name Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-5247
1744-7593
Publication date 2017-04-13
Year available 2017
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1080/17425247.2017.1316262
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 33
End page 45
Total pages 13
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 3003 Pharmaceutical Science
Abstract Introduction: Vascular-targeted drug delivery is a promising approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis, due to the vast involvement of endothelium in the initiation and growth of plaque, a characteristic of atherosclerosis. One of the major challenges in carrier design for targeting cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is that carriers must be able to navigate the circulation system and efficiently marginate to the endothelium in order to interact with the target receptors. Areas covered: This review draws on studies that have focused on the role of particle size, shape, and density (along with flow hemodynamics and hemorheology) on the localization of the particles to activated endothelial cell surfaces and vascular walls under different flow conditions, especially those relevant to atherosclerosis. Expert opinion: Generally, the size, shape, and density of a particle affect its adhesion to vascular walls synergistically, and these three factors should be considered simultaneously when designing an optimal carrier for targeting CVD. Available preliminary data should encourage more studies to be conducted to investigate the use of nano-constructs, characterized by a sub-micrometer size, a non-spherical shape, and a high material density to maximize vascular wall margination and minimize capillary entrapment, as carriers for targeting CVD.
Formatted abstract
Introduction: Vascular-targeted drug delivery is a promising approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis, due to the vast involvement of endothelium in the initiation and growth of plaque, a characteristic of atherosclerosis. One of the major challenges in carrier design for targeting cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is that carriers must be able to navigate the circulation system and efficiently marginate to the endothelium in order to interact with the target receptors.

Areas covered: This review draws on studies that have focused on the role of particle size, shape, and density (along with flow hemodynamics and hemorheology) on the localization of the particles to activated endothelial cell surfaces and vascular walls under different flow conditions, especially those relevant to atherosclerosis.

Expert opinion: Generally, the size, shape, and density of a particle affect its adhesion to vascular walls synergistically, and these three factors should be considered simultaneously when designing an optimal carrier for targeting CVD. Available preliminary data should encourage more studies to be conducted to investigate the use of nano-constructs, characterized by a sub-micrometer size, a non-spherical shape, and a high material density to maximize vascular wall margination and minimize capillary entrapment, as carriers for targeting CVD.
Keyword Particle physical properties
Particle shape
Particle size
Particle density
Flow characteristics
Margination
Cardiovascular diseases
Atherosclerosis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID APP1037310
CE140100036
FT0992210
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 17 May 2017, 15:38:15 EST by Hang Ta on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology