A psychoevolutionary approach to identifying preferred nature scenes with potential to provide restoration from stress

Thake, Carole L., Bambling, M., Edirippulige, S. and Marx, E. (2017) A psychoevolutionary approach to identifying preferred nature scenes with potential to provide restoration from stress. Health Environments Research and Design Journal, 10 5: 111-124. doi:10.1177/1937586717705085


Author Thake, Carole L.
Bambling, M.
Edirippulige, S.
Marx, E.
Title A psychoevolutionary approach to identifying preferred nature scenes with potential to provide restoration from stress
Journal name Health Environments Research and Design Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1937-5867
2167-5112
Publication date 2017-04-28
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1937586717705085
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 10
Issue 5
Start page 111
End page 124
Total pages 14
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract Background: Research supports therapeutic use of nature scenes in healthcare settings, particularly to reduce stress. However, limited literature is available to provide a cohesive guide for selecting scenes that may provide optimal therapeutic effect.
Formatted abstract
Background:
Research supports therapeutic use of nature scenes in healthcare settings, particularly to reduce stress. However, limited literature is available to provide a cohesive guide for selecting scenes that may provide optimal therapeutic effect.

Objective:
This study produced and tested a replicable process for selecting nature scenes with therapeutic potential. Psychoevolutionary theory informed the construction of the Importance for Survival Scale (IFSS), and its usefulness for identifying scenes that people generally prefer to view and that hold potential to reduce stress was tested.

Methods:
Relationships between Importance for Survival (IFS), preference, and restoration were tested. General community participants (N = 20 males, 20 females; M age = 48 years) Q-sorted sets of landscape photographs (preranked by the researcher in terms of IFS using the IFSS) from most to least preferred, and then completed the Short-Version Revised Restoration Scale in response to viewing a selection of the scenes.

Results:
Results showed significant positive relationships between IFS and each of scene preference (large effect), and restoration potential (medium effect), as well as between scene preference and restoration potential across the levels of IFS (medium effect), and for individual participants and scenes (large effect).

Conclusions:
IFS was supported as a framework for identifying nature scenes that people will generally prefer to view and that hold potential for restoration from emotional distress; however, greater therapeutic potential may be expected when people can choose which of the scenes they would prefer to view. Evidence for the effectiveness of the IFSS was produced.
Keyword Preference
Health
Environments
Recovery
Anxiety
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Faculty of Medicine
Admin Only - Centre for Health Services Research
 
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Created: Fri, 12 May 2017, 09:52:39 EST by Burke, Eliza on behalf of Centre for Health Services Research