The relationship of a clonal outbreak of Enterococcus faecium vanA to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus incidence in an Australian hospital

Bartley, P. B., Schooneveldt, J. M., Looke, D. F. M., Morton, A., Johnson, D. W. and Nimmo, G. R. (2001) The relationship of a clonal outbreak of Enterococcus faecium vanA to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus incidence in an Australian hospital. Journal of Hospital Infection, 48 1: 43-54. doi:10.1053/jhin.2000.0915


Author Bartley, P. B.
Schooneveldt, J. M.
Looke, D. F. M.
Morton, A.
Johnson, D. W.
Nimmo, G. R.
Title The relationship of a clonal outbreak of Enterococcus faecium vanA to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus incidence in an Australian hospital
Journal name Journal of Hospital Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0195-6701
Publication date 2001-05-01
Year available 2001
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1053/jhin.2000.0915
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 48
Issue 1
Start page 43
End page 54
Total pages 12
Editor G.L. French
Place of publication London
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Language eng
Subject C1
730101 Infectious diseases
110309 Infectious Diseases
Abstract Australian isolates of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have been widely scattered geographically, predominantly polyclonal and of the VanB phenotype. Forty-nine VRE were isolated from 47 patients in our hospital from October 1996 to December 1999. Forty-four of these VRE were Enterococcus faecium with a vanA glycopeptide resistance genotype. Four isolates were pathogenic. Thirty-five VRE were from an outbreak in the Renal and Infectious Diseases Units over a four-month period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) demonstrated that 41 of the 49 VRE were indistinguishable or closely related. Enhanced environmental cleaning, strict contact isolation of colonized patients and reducing inpatient admissions terminated the epidemic. Cohorting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-positive patients was restricted because VPE patients occupied the isolation facilities. This resulted in a statistically significant increase in MRSA infections across the hospital. VRE epidemics have the ability to influence the epidemiology of other nosocomial pathogens when infection control resources are exhausted. (C) 2001 The Hospital Infection Society.
Keyword Infectious Diseases
Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus
Nosocomial Epidemic
Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis
Field Gel-electrophoresis
Vancomycin Resistance
Restriction
Infection
Faecalis
Patterns
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 01:15:33 EST