Are hospital emergency department visits due to dog bites associated with ambient temperature? A time-series study in Beijing, China

Zhang, Yongming, Zhao, Qi, Zhang, Wenyi, Li, Shanshan, Chen, Gongbo, Han, Zhihai and Guo, Yuming (2017) Are hospital emergency department visits due to dog bites associated with ambient temperature? A time-series study in Beijing, China. Science of the Total Environment, 598 71-76. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.112


Author Zhang, Yongming
Zhao, Qi
Zhang, Wenyi
Li, Shanshan
Chen, Gongbo
Han, Zhihai
Guo, Yuming
Title Are hospital emergency department visits due to dog bites associated with ambient temperature? A time-series study in Beijing, China
Journal name Science of the Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-1026
0048-9697
Publication date 2017-11-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.112
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 598
Start page 71
End page 76
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject 2305 Environmental Engineering
2304 Environmental Chemistry
2311 Waste Management and Disposal
2310 Pollution
Abstract Background It is well documented that suboptimal ambient temperature is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, no study has examined the relation between temperature and dog bites. Objectives To study the association between ambient temperature and daily hospital emergency department visits due to dog bites (EDVDBs) in Beijing, China; and to explore whether the temperature-EDVDB association varies by sex and age. Methods Daily EDVDBs were collected from a hospital appointed for dog bites in Beijing during 2012–2014. A quasi-Poisson regression with distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was employed to estimate the impact of temperature on daily EDVDBs. Stratified analysis was performed to examine the temperature-EDVDB association by sex and age-groups. Sensitivity analysis was performed to check the robustness of the results by adjusting other meteorological variables and air pollutants. Results A total of 42,481 EDVDBs were collected, with daily cases ranged from 15 to 71. The association between temperature and EDVDBs was U-shaped, with extreme cold temperature showing a weaker, delayed and shorter effect on the risk of dog bites while the effect of extreme hot temperature being stronger, more immediate and lasting longer. Cold temperature had a greater impact on female whereas male was more sensitive to hot temperature. The temperature-EDVDB association was unapparent in the 15–21 years group. The cold effect was only significant in the 0–14 years group whereas all age-groups suffered from the similar heat effect except those aged 22–45 years. Adjusting other meteorological variables and air pollutants did not change the results. Conclusions The impact of temperature on EDVDBs is U-shaped in Beijing, China which varies by sex and age. The temperature effect is independent from other meteorological variables and air pollutants.
Formatted abstract
Background: It is well documented that suboptimal ambient temperature is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, no study has examined the relation between temperature and dog bites.

Objectives: To study the association between ambient temperature and daily hospital emergency department visits due to dog bites (EDVDBs) in Beijing, China; and to explore whether the temperature-EDVDB association varies by sex and age.

Methods: Daily EDVDBs were collected from a hospital appointed for dog bites in Beijing during 2012–2014. A quasi-Poisson regression with distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was employed to estimate the impact of temperature on daily EDVDBs. Stratified analysis was performed to examine the temperature-EDVDB association by sex and age-groups. Sensitivity analysis was performed to check the robustness of the results by adjusting other meteorological variables and air pollutants.

Results: A total of 42,481 EDVDBs were collected, with daily cases ranged from 15 to 71. The association between temperature and EDVDBs was U-shaped, with extreme cold temperature showing a weaker, delayed and shorter effect on the risk of dog bites while the effect of extreme hot temperature being stronger, more immediate and lasting longer. Cold temperature had a greater impact on female whereas male was more sensitive to hot temperature. The temperature-EDVDB association was unapparent in the 15–21 years group. The cold effect was only significant in the 0–14 years group whereas all age-groups suffered from the similar heat effect except those aged 22–45 years. Adjusting other meteorological variables and air pollutants did not change the results.

Conclusions: The impact of temperature on EDVDBs is U-shaped in Beijing, China which varies by sex and age. The temperature effect is independent from other meteorological variables and air pollutants.
Keyword Distributed lag non-linear model
Dog attack
Suboptimal temperature
Vulnerable populations
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
Admin Only - School of Public Health
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 09 May 2017, 00:23:47 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)