Rapid population decline in migratory shorebirds relying on Yellow Sea tidal mudflats as stopover sites

Studds, Colin E., Kendall, Bruce E., Murray, Nicholas J., Wilson, Howard B., Rogers, Danny I., Clemens, Robert S., Gosbell, Ken, Hassell, Chris J., Jessop, Rosalind, Melville, David S., Milton, David A., Minton, Clive D. T., Possingham, Hugh P., Riegen, Adrian C., Straw, Phil, Woehler, Eric J. and Fuller, Richard A. (2017) Rapid population decline in migratory shorebirds relying on Yellow Sea tidal mudflats as stopover sites. Nature Communications, 8 . doi:10.1038/ncomms14895


Author Studds, Colin E.
Kendall, Bruce E.
Murray, Nicholas J.
Wilson, Howard B.
Rogers, Danny I.
Clemens, Robert S.
Gosbell, Ken
Hassell, Chris J.
Jessop, Rosalind
Melville, David S.
Milton, David A.
Minton, Clive D. T.
Possingham, Hugh P.
Riegen, Adrian C.
Straw, Phil
Woehler, Eric J.
Fuller, Richard A.
Title Rapid population decline in migratory shorebirds relying on Yellow Sea tidal mudflats as stopover sites
Journal name Nature Communications   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2041-1723
Publication date 2017-04-13
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ncomms14895
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Abstract Migratory animals are threatened by human-induced global change. However, little is known about how stopover habitat, essential for refuelling during migration, affects the population dynamics of migratory species. Using 20 years of continent-wide citizen science data, we assess population trends of ten shorebird taxa that refuel on Yellow Sea tidal mudflats, a threatened ecosystem that has shrunk by >65% in recent decades. Seven of the taxa declined at rates of up to 8% per year. Taxa with the greatest reliance on the Yellow Sea as a stopover site showed the greatest declines, whereas those that stop primarily in other regions had slowly declining or stable populations. Decline rate was unaffected by shared evolutionary history among taxa and was not predicted by migration distance, breeding range size, non-breeding location, generation time or body size. These results suggest that changes in stopover habitat can severely limit migratory populations.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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