The major envelope glycoprotein of Murid Herpesvirus-4 promotes sexual transmission

Zeippen, Caroline, Javaux, Justine, Xiao, Xue, Ledecq, Marina, Mast, Jan, Farnir, Frédéric, Vanderplasschen, Alain, Stevenson, Philip and Gillet, Laurent (2017) The major envelope glycoprotein of Murid Herpesvirus-4 promotes sexual transmission. Journal of Virology, 91 13: . doi:10.1128/JVI.00235-17

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Author Zeippen, Caroline
Javaux, Justine
Xiao, Xue
Ledecq, Marina
Mast, Jan
Farnir, Frédéric
Vanderplasschen, Alain
Stevenson, Philip
Gillet, Laurent
Title The major envelope glycoprotein of Murid Herpesvirus-4 promotes sexual transmission
Journal name Journal of Virology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-538X
1098-5514
Publication date 2017-07-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/JVI.00235-17
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 91
Issue 13
Total pages 13
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Language eng
Abstract Gammaherpesviruses are important human and animal pathogens. Infection control has proven difficult because the key process of transmission is ill understood. Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4), a gammaherpesvirus of mice, is transmitted sexually. We show that this depends on the major virion envelope glycoprotein gp150. gp150 is redundant for host entry, and in vitro, it regulates rather than promotes cell binding. We show that gp150-deficient MuHV-4 reaches and replicates normally in the female genital tract after nasal infection but is poorly released from vaginal epithelial cells and fails to pass from the female to the male genital tract during sexual contact. Thus, we show that the regulation of virion binding is a key component of spontaneous gammaherpesvirus transmission.IMPORTANCE Gammaherpesviruses are responsible for many important diseases in both animals and humans. Some important aspects of their life cycle are still poorly understood. Key among these is viral transmission. Here we show that the major envelope glycoprotein of murid herpesvirus 4 functions not in entry or dissemination but in virion release to allow sexual transmission to new hosts.
Formatted abstract
Gammaherpesviruses are important human and animal pathogens. Infection control has proved difficult because the key process of transmission is ill-understood. Murid herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), a gammaherpesvirus of mice, transmits sexually. We show that this depends on the major virion envelope glycoprotein, gp150. Gp150 is redundant for host entry and, in vitro, it regulates rather than promotes cell binding. We show that gp150-deficient MuHV-4 reaches and replicates normally in the female genital tract after nasal infection, but is poorly released from vaginal epithelial cells and fails to pass from the female to the male genital tract during sexual contact. Thus, we show that regulation of virion binding is a key component of spontaneous gammaherpesvirus transmission.

IMPORTANCE
Gammaherpesviruses are responsible for many important diseases both in animals and humans. Some important aspects of their lifecycle are still poorly understood. Key amongst these is viral transmission. Here we show that the major envelope glycoprotein of Murid Herpesvirus 4 functions not in entry or dissemination, but in virion release to allow sexual transmission to new hosts.
Keyword Gammaherpesvirus
Glycoprotein
Release
Transmission
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number e00235-17

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Admin only - CHRC
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 05 May 2017, 12:04:56 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences