Is body mass index associated with lowest mortality increasing over time?

Wang, Zhiqiang, Peng, Yang and Bin Dong (2017) Is body mass index associated with lowest mortality increasing over time?. International Journal of Obesity, 41 8: 1171-1175. doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.107


Author Wang, Zhiqiang
Peng, Yang
Bin Dong
Title Is body mass index associated with lowest mortality increasing over time?
Journal name International Journal of Obesity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Publication date 2017-05-03
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2017.107
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 41
Issue 8
Start page 1171
End page 1175
Total pages 21
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 2701 Medicine (miscellaneous)
2712 Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
2916 Nutrition and Dietetics
Abstract It is debatable whether the body mass index (BMI) value that is associated with the lowest all-cause mortality has increased over time. Such an increase might indicate that the WHO BMI categories for normal weight and overweight need to be revised over time. This study assessed whether the BMI associated with the lowest all-cause mortality increased over time among US adults in the National Health Interview Survey.
Formatted abstract
BACKGROUND: It is debatable whether the BMI value that is associated with the lowest all-cause mortality has increased over time. Such an increase might indicate that the WHO BMI categories for normal weight and overweight need to be revised over time. This study assessed whether the BMI associated with the lowest all-cause mortality increased over time among US adults in the National Health Interview Survey.

METHODS: This survey with up to 25 years of follow-up included 901 197 participants, aged 20 to 79 years with baseline BMI between 18.5 to 39.9 kg/m2 and known mortality status between the original survey dates and 31 December 2011. BMI values associated with the lowest mortality were estimated for different survey time periods: 1986–1989, 1990–1994, 1995–1999, 2000–2004, and 2000–2009.

RESULTS: Among 901 197 participants, 130 495 died during over 14.5 million person-years of follow-up. There was a U-shaped BMI-mortality association in all survey periods. When we used the original follow-up durations, the BMI associated with the lowest mortality increased monotonically from 23.9 kg/m2 in 1986–89 to 28.6 kg/m2 in 2005–09. When using a fixed follow-up duration of 5, 10, 15 or 20 years, we found no monotonic increasing pattern in the BMI associated with the lowest mortality. With duration of 15 years, the estimates of BMI associated with lowest mortality appeared to be relatively stable over time among both the general population and never smokers free from CVD and cancer at baseline.

CONCLUSIONS: With a fixed long-term follow-up duration, the BMI value associated with the lowest mortality remains relatively stable over time.
Keyword Endocrinology & Metabolism
Nutrition & Dietetics
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Nutrition & Dietetics
Q-Index Code C1
Grant ID APP1042343
44078179
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
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Created: Thu, 04 May 2017, 13:55:41 EST by Zhiqiang Wang on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research