The alcohol withdrawal syndrome

Hall, Wayne and Zador, Deborah (1997) The alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Lancet, 349 9069: 1897-1900. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(97)04572-8


Author Hall, Wayne
Zador, Deborah
Title The alcohol withdrawal syndrome
Journal name Lancet   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0140-6736
1474-547X
Publication date 1997-06-28
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)04572-8
Volume 349
Issue 9069
Start page 1897
End page 1900
Total pages 4
Place of publication London
Publisher Lancet Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract The alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a set of signs and symptoms that typically develops in alcohol-dependent people within 6–24 h of their last drink. It may occur unintentionally if abstinence is enforced by illness or injury, or deliberately if the person voluntarily stops drinking because of an alcohol-related illness, or as a prelude to becoming and remaining abstinent. The signs and symptoms of the syndrome (panel) are largely, but not exclusively, those of autonomic hyperactivity, the reverse of the effects of alcohol intoxication. They represent a homoeostatic readjustment of the central nervous system (CNS) to the neuroadaptation that occurs with prolonged alcohol intoxication.1 RC Turner, PR Lichstein and JG Peden et al., Alcohol withdrawal syndromes: a review of pathophysiology, clinical presentation and treatment, J Gen Intern Med 4 (1989), pp. 432–444. Full Text via CrossRef | View Record in Scopus | Cited By in Scopus (39)1 They vary in severity from mild to severe.1
Keyword Medicine, General & Internal
Home Detoxification
Care
Intoxication
Management
Inpatient
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 93 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 02:52:33 EST