Investigating strategies used by hospital pharmacists to effectively communicate with patients during medication counselling

Chevalier, Bernadette A. M., Watson, Bernadette M., Barras, Michael A. and Cottrell, William Neil (2017) Investigating strategies used by hospital pharmacists to effectively communicate with patients during medication counselling. Health Expectations, 20 5: 1121-1132. doi:10.1111/hex.12558


Author Chevalier, Bernadette A. M.
Watson, Bernadette M.
Barras, Michael A.
Cottrell, William Neil
Title Investigating strategies used by hospital pharmacists to effectively communicate with patients during medication counselling
Journal name Health Expectations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1369-7625
1369-6513
Publication date 2017-03-30
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/hex.12558
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 20
Issue 5
Start page 1121
End page 1132
Total pages 12
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Medication counselling opportunities are key times for pharmacists and patients to discuss medications and patients' concerns about their therapy. Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) describes behavioural, motivational and emotional processes underlying communication exchanges. Five CAT strategies (approximation, interpretability, discourse management, emotional expression and interpersonal control) permit identification of effective communication.
Formatted abstract
Background

Medication counselling opportunities are key times for pharmacists and patients to discuss medications and patients’ concerns about their therapy. Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) describes behavioural, motivational and emotional processes underlying communication exchanges. Five CAT strategies (approximation, interpretability, discourse management, emotional expression and interpersonal control) permit identification of effective communication.

Objective

To invoke CAT to investigate communication strategies used by hospital pharmacists during patient medication counselling.

Design

This was a theory-based, qualitative study using transcribed audiorecordings of patients and hospital pharmacists engaged in medication counselling.

Setting and participants

Recruited pharmacists practised in inpatient or outpatient settings. Eligible patients within participating pharmacists’ practice sites were prescribed at least three medications to manage chronic disease(s).

Main outcome measures

The extent to which pharmacists accommodate, or not, to patients’ conversational needs based on accommodative behaviour described within CAT strategies.

Results

Twelve pharmacists engaged four patients (48 total interactions). Exemplars provided robust examples of pharmacists effectively accommodating or meeting patients’ conversational needs. Non-accommodation mainly occurred when pharmacists spoke too quickly, used terms not understood by patients and did not include patients in the agenda-setting phase. Multiple strategy use resulted in communication patterns such as “information-reassurance-rationale” sandwiches.

Discussion and conclusions

Most pharmacists effectively employed all five CAT strategies to engage patients in discussions. Pharmacists’ communication could be improved at the initial agenda-setting phase by asking open-ended questions to invite patients’ input and allow patients to identify any medication-related concerns or issues.
Keyword Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT)
Communication
Hospital pharmacist
Patient
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 25 Apr 2017, 00:26:36 EST by Web Cron on behalf of School of Pharmacy