"It's just a bit of cultural [...] lost in translation": Australian and British intracultural and intercultural metapragmatic evaluations of jocularity

Sinkeviciute, Valeria (2017) "It's just a bit of cultural [...] lost in translation": Australian and British intracultural and intercultural metapragmatic evaluations of jocularity. Lingua, 197 50-67. doi:10.1016/j.lingua.2017.03.004

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Author Sinkeviciute, Valeria
Title "It's just a bit of cultural [...] lost in translation": Australian and British intracultural and intercultural metapragmatic evaluations of jocularity
Journal name Lingua   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0024-3841
1872-6135
Publication date 2017-10-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.lingua.2017.03.004
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 197
Start page 50
End page 67
Total pages 18
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This paper explores evaluations of attempts at humour and reactions to them by participants and non-participants in a jocular interaction. There are two levels of analysis: (1) the instigator's jocular comment and the target's reaction to it, taken from the reality television gameshow Big Brother Australia 2012, and (2) the Australian and British interviewees’ (non-participants’) intracultural (inside one's own cultural context) and intercultural (from another cultural context) evaluations of the comment and the reaction to it. It is true that jocularity in both cultural contexts is highly appreciated and tends to produce a laughing (or at least not a confrontational) reaction, which shows one's ability to laugh at oneself and not take oneself too seriously. However, there are particular differences in intracultural and intercultural evaluations. For instance, while it was noticed that the Australian interviewees tend to make culture-specific remarks about how different their own and British understanding of humour is, the British interviewees try to avoid cultural or collective references and rather focus on jocularity-related benefits in interaction.
Keyword Jocularity
Australian
British
Interviews
Metapragmatics
Intercultural evaluations
Intracultural evaluations
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 25 Apr 2017, 00:26:36 EST by Web Cron on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures