In vivo fate of carbon nanotubes with different physicochemical properties for gene delivery applications

Cifuentes-Rius, Anna, Boase, Nathan R. B., Font, Ines, Coronas, Nuria, Ramos-Perez, Victor, Thurecht, Kristofer J. and Borros, Salvador (2017) In vivo fate of carbon nanotubes with different physicochemical properties for gene delivery applications. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 9 13: 11461-11471. doi:10.1021/acsami.7b00677


Author Cifuentes-Rius, Anna
Boase, Nathan R. B.
Font, Ines
Coronas, Nuria
Ramos-Perez, Victor
Thurecht, Kristofer J.
Borros, Salvador
Title In vivo fate of carbon nanotubes with different physicochemical properties for gene delivery applications
Journal name ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1944-8252
1944-8244
Publication date 2017-04-05
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/acsami.7b00677
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 9
Issue 13
Start page 11461
End page 11471
Total pages 11
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Subject 2500 Materials Science
Abstract Gene therapy has arisen as a pioneering technique to treat diseases by direct employment of nucleic acids as medicine. The major historical problem is to develop efficient and safe systems for the delivery of therapeutic genes into the target cells. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have demonstrated considerable promise as delivery vectors due to their (i) high aspect ratio and (ii) capacity to translocate through plasma membranes, known as the nanoneedle effect. To leverage these advantages, close attention needs to be paid to the physicochemical characteristics of the CNTs used. CNTs with different diameters (thinner and thicker) were treated by chemical oxidation to produce shorter fragments. Rigid (thick) and flexible (thin) CNTs, and their shortened versions, were coated with polyallylamine (ppAA) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The ppAA coating leads to a positively charged CNT surface that is able to electrostatically bind the green fluorescent protein plasmid reporter. This study shows how rigidity and length can affect their (i) behavior in biological media, (ii) ability to transfect in vitro, and (iii) biodistribution in vivo. This study also generates a set of basic design rules for the development of more efficient CNT-based gene-delivery vectors.
Keyword Biodistribution
Carbon nanotube rigidity
Carbon nanotubes
Cytotoxicity
Gene transfection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID SGR 2009
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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