Late-season non-selective herbicide application reduces Lolium rigidum seed numbers, seed viability, and seedling fitness

Steadman, Kathryn J., Eaton, Debra M., Plummer, Julie A., Ferris, David G. and Powles, Stephen B. (2006) Late-season non-selective herbicide application reduces Lolium rigidum seed numbers, seed viability, and seedling fitness. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, 57 1: 133-141. doi:10.1071/AR05122


Author Steadman, Kathryn J.
Eaton, Debra M.
Plummer, Julie A.
Ferris, David G.
Powles, Stephen B.
Title Late-season non-selective herbicide application reduces Lolium rigidum seed numbers, seed viability, and seedling fitness
Journal name Australian Journal of Agricultural Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9409
Publication date 2006-01-01
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AR05122
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 57
Issue 1
Start page 133
End page 141
Total pages 9
Place of publication Collingwood
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Subject 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management
Abstract Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of Lolium rigidum (annual ryegrass) seed developmental stage and application rate of glyphosate and SpraySeed (paraquat 135 g/L+ diquat 115 g/L) on the number, germinability, and fitness of seeds produced. Glyphosate (450 g/L) was most effective when applied at a rate of 0.5-1 L/ha during heading and anthesis, reducing the number of filled seeds produced compared with unsprayed plants. Application post-anthesis, when seeds were at the milk to soft dough stage, was less effective. SpraySeed was most effective when applied post-anthesis, during the milk and early dough stages of seed development at a rate of 0.5-1L/ha, resulting in the production of few viable seeds. Although some filled seeds were produced, most of the seeds were dead. Application during anthesis or once the seeds reached soft dough stage was less effective. For both herbicides, those seeds that were capable of germinating were smaller and had slower radicle and coleoptile growth, resulting in slower early seedling growth and reduced biomass production within the first month of growth. Additionally, glyphosate application reduced the proportion of seeds exhibiting dormancy. The anticipated reduction in seed competitive ability and altered emergence timing resulting from late-season herbicide application, even when application timing is not optimal, could be exploited to reduce the likelihood of successful L. rigidum establishment in the following season.
Keyword Agriculture, Multidisciplinary
Spray-top
Weed Control
Seed Development
Germination
Dormancy
Glyphosate
Roundup
Paraquat
Sprayseed
Avena-fatua
Dormancy Release
Water-content
Grain-yield
Wheat
Emergence
Ryegrass
Growth
Crop
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 01:56:28 EST