Priorities for ecological restoration in the Western Woodlands Way

Fuller, Richard A., Drielsma, Michael J., Watson, James E.M., Taylor, Robert, Sushinsky, Jessica, Smith, Jill and Possingham, Hugh P. (2009) Priorities for ecological restoration in the Western Woodlands Way Brisbane, Australia; Armidale, NSW, Australia: Spatial Ecology Laboratory, University of Queensland; GIS Research and Development Unit, New South Wales Department of Environment and Climate Change

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Author Fuller, Richard A.
Drielsma, Michael J.
Watson, James E.M.
Taylor, Robert
Sushinsky, Jessica
Smith, Jill
Possingham, Hugh P.
Title of report Priorities for ecological restoration in the Western Woodlands Way
Publication date 2009-01-01
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Publisher Spatial Ecology Laboratory, University of Queensland; GIS Research and Development Unit, New South Wales Department of Environment and Climate Change
Place of publication Brisbane, Australia; Armidale, NSW, Australia
Total pages 91
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The biodiversity of Australia is undergoing serious and ongoing declines, resulting principally
from loss and fragmentation of native vegetation through agricultural development. These
problems are especially critical in areas such as the New South Wales tablelands, where
clearance of native woodlands for agriculture has resulted in large population losses for many
native species.
 The Western Woodlands Way (WWW) is a large scale response to this, a vision shared by the
community, individuals, groups, and governments, also aimed at mitigating climate change
threats likely to cause native animal and plant extinctions and impacts to water catchments and
supplies.
 This report develops the scientific basis for prioritizing ecological restoration activity that will
increase the extent of suitable habitat for woodland-dependent threatened species in the
region, as well as increasing the degree of connectivity across the landscape.
 A broad scale prioritization analysis reveals about 1400 properties that are key to fulfilling these
joint biodiversity and connectivity objectives, and explicitly maps where these priorities occur
within the WWW region. Funding in the region of $130 million is required to realize this
programme in full for active revegetation and about a tenth of this for applying strategic grazing.
 Through a fine-scale scenario analysis, we also identify the best strategy for allocating
restoration effort within a property boundary to maximize the degree of connection between a
particular property and its neighbours. Potential actions include strategic grazing, exclusion of
grazing, passive and active revegetation.
 The plans we present here are fully updatable as new information becomes available, and are
designed to incorporate social realities such as variation in stakeholder willingness to
participate, and spatial variation in costs of implementation. Iteration of the prioritizations we
have developed here will allow robust and coherent networks of restoration priorities to be
updated over time.
Additional Notes Report commissioned by the four Catchment Management Authorities of the Western Woodlands Way: Border Rivers / Gwydir, Central West, Lachlan, and Namoi.

Document type: Research Report
Collection: School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Apr 2017, 13:05:40 EST by James Watson on behalf of School of Earth and Environmental Sciences