The value of citizen science data for passive surveillance of wildlife

Dissanayake, R. B, Stevenson, M., Allavena, R. and Henning, J. (2017). The value of citizen science data for passive surveillance of wildlife. In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Animal Health Surveillance Conference: Beyond animal health surveillance. 3rd International Animal Health Surveillance Conference, Rotorua, New Zealand, (53-55). 30 April - 4 May 2017.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Dissanayake, R. B
Stevenson, M.
Allavena, R.
Henning, J.
Title of paper The value of citizen science data for passive surveillance of wildlife
Conference name 3rd International Animal Health Surveillance Conference
Conference location Rotorua, New Zealand
Conference dates 30 April - 4 May 2017
Convener New Zealand Veterinary Association
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 3rd International Animal Health Surveillance Conference: Beyond animal health surveillance
Place of Publication Wellington, New Zealand
Publisher New Zealand Veterinary Association
Publication Year 2017
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISSN 2253-6568
Start page 53
End page 55
Total pages 3
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The collection of wildlife distribution data using standard survey sampling methods is expensive. For this reason surveys are often limited to small geographical areas and are usually conducted over short time periods. We used a citizen science dataset on koala sightings reported between 1997 and 2013 across eight local government areas in South East Queensland (SEQLD), Australia (n=11,029) to identify spatial and temporal trends of koala sightings. In addition we used koala sightings data from 2011 (n=353) to model koala distribution. The spatial aggregation of sightings was high in high koala density areas and in areas closer to roads. Temporal trends of sightings mirrored the breeding season of koalas with an increase in the number of sightings per day between September and October. Our results suggest that citizen science data are a useful data source for wildlife population monitoring and are suitable for refining and supporting koala density estimates derived from active survey sampling approaches.
Keyword Koala
KoalaBASE
Queensland
Surveillance
Citizen science
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Publication No. 331

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Wed, 19 Apr 2017, 13:05:02 EST by Joerg Henning on behalf of School of Veterinary Science