The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) in SE QLD: using passive surveillance to understand the decline of an iconic species

Gonzalez-Astudillo, Viviana, Allavena, Rachel E., Henning, Joerg, Larkin, R. and McKinnon, A. (2016). The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) in SE QLD: using passive surveillance to understand the decline of an iconic species. In: 4th Oceania Congress for Conservation Biology (OCCB), Brisbane, Australia, (). 6-8 July 2007.

Author Gonzalez-Astudillo, Viviana
Allavena, Rachel E.
Henning, Joerg
Larkin, R.
McKinnon, A.
Title of paper The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) in SE QLD: using passive surveillance to understand the decline of an iconic species
Conference name 4th Oceania Congress for Conservation Biology (OCCB)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 6-8 July 2007
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Fully published paper
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Since the 1990s, koalas in South-East Queensland (SEQLD) have experienced a severe
decline. Although data are collected in wildlife hospitals upon submission, the lack of
standardized data recording and analysis of causes and risk factors of diseases and mortalities
limits actions required to reduce conservation threats. Utilising a government-managed
wildlife hospital database, we explored the aetiological causes of morbidity and mortality in
20,250 SEQLD koalas during 1997-2013. Ten aetiological causes of submission were
identified. Trauma or combination of trauma (by motor vehicles) with infections by
Chlamydia spp. (urinary - 20%, genital - 10%, ocular -12%) were the most common reasons
for submission. There was a significant difference between the years of submission, season,
sex and age, and outcome (dead on arrival, euthanised, released). Similar numbers of males
(n=10,232) and females (n=9,624) were submitted; however, adults comprised well over half
of submissions (n=14,875). Using multinomial logistic regression models, risk factors
associated with the outcome were identified for each aetiological cause. Although data from
hospital submissions have limitations, they represent valuable tools for long-term, passive
surveillance and the development of threat maps. Determining the causes of decline will aid
the QLD government in establishing policies for future management targeting the
conservation of koalas and their unique ecosystem.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Apr 2017, 12:58:24 EST by Joerg Henning on behalf of School of Veterinary Science