Don’t need help, don’t want help, can’t get help: how patients with brain tumors account for not using rehabilitation, psychosocial and community services

Langbecker, Danette, Ekberg, Stuart and Yates, Patsy (2017) Don’t need help, don’t want help, can’t get help: how patients with brain tumors account for not using rehabilitation, psychosocial and community services. Patient Education and Counseling, . doi:10.1016/j.pec.2017.04.004

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Author Langbecker, Danette
Ekberg, Stuart
Yates, Patsy
Title Don’t need help, don’t want help, can’t get help: how patients with brain tumors account for not using rehabilitation, psychosocial and community services
Journal name Patient Education and Counseling   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0738-3991
1873-5134
Publication date 2017-04-14
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2017.04.004
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Total pages 1
Place of publication Shannon, Clare Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective

To understand why some adults with primary brain tumors do not use support services despite indications of a need for help.

Methods

Nineteen adults recently diagnosed with primary brain tumors participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify recurrent ways participants explained their non-use of support services.

Results

Some patients indicated that they did not use support services as they did not need help, in particular reporting positive experiences relative to their expectations or to others, that their needs were met, or difficulties recognising their needs. Some patients reported not wanting help, citing preferences to self-manage, other priorities, or negative perceptions of the services available. Many patients identified barriers to support service utilisation, particularly problems recognising that services could address their needs and that their needs were valid concerns.

Conclusion

The gap between patients’ needs and their service use may result from patients’ expectations from the medical system, shifting of standards for well-being, cognitive changes, and access issues.

Practice implications

Addressing knowledge barriers and perceptions relating to help-seeking, as well as recognising the challenges specific to this patient group in terms of need recognition and access issues, may assist in improving patients’ physical, psychological and social well-being.
Keyword Brain tumors
Community services
Rehabilitation
Help-seeking
Support
Service delivery
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Online Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 18 Apr 2017, 08:36:49 EST by Danette Langbecker on behalf of Centre for Health Services Research