The spread of private tutoring in English in developing societies: exploring students’ perceptions

Hamid, M. Obaidul, Khan, Asaduzzaman and Islam, M. Monjurul (2017) The spread of private tutoring in English in developing societies: exploring students’ perceptions. Discourse, 1-19. doi:10.1080/01596306.2017.1308314

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Author Hamid, M. Obaidul
Khan, Asaduzzaman
Islam, M. Monjurul
Title The spread of private tutoring in English in developing societies: exploring students’ perceptions
Journal name Discourse   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0159-6306
1469-3739
Publication date 2017-04-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/01596306.2017.1308314
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Although research on private tutoring has gained visibility in recent years, private tutoring in English (PT-E) has not received notable attention. This paper examines students’ perceptions of PT-E in Bangladesh in terms of its necessity and helpfulness, peer pressure in PT-E participation and ethicality of PT-E practice and government intervention. Our analysis of survey data (N = 572) leads to characterising PT-E and explaining the reasons for its popularity. As a popular learning space beyond formal schooling, PT-E is available in various forms and quality catering to the purchasing power of different social groups. We argue that students may resort to PT-E not because of its proven effectiveness but because of their declining faith in school English teaching. The paper contributes to our understanding of the complex interactions between the curricular (school) and non-curricular (PT-E) settings and family socioeconomic resources in the teaching of English as a globally desired language.
Keyword Private tutoring in English
Language beyond the classroom
English language curriculum
Student perceptions
Neoliberalism and education
Bangladesh
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Library has an electronic copy

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 13 Apr 2017, 10:52:24 EST by Ady Boreham on behalf of School of Education