Self-management of health care: multimethod study of using integrated health care and supportive housing to address systematic barriers for people experiencing homelessness

Parsell, Cameron , ten Have, Charlotte , Denton, Michelle and Walter, Zoe (2017) Self-management of health care: multimethod study of using integrated health care and supportive housing to address systematic barriers for people experiencing homelessness. Australian Health Review, . doi:10.1071/AH16277


Author Parsell, Cameron
ten Have, Charlotte
Denton, Michelle
Walter, Zoe
Title Self-management of health care: multimethod study of using integrated health care and supportive housing to address systematic barriers for people experiencing homelessness
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
Publication date 2017-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH16277
Open Access Status DOI
Total pages 6
Place of publication Clayton, VIC Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives. The aims of the present study were to examine tenants’ experiences of a model of integrated health care
and supportive housing and to identify whether integrated health care and supportive housing improved self-reported
health and healthcare access.
Methods. The present study used a mixed-method survey design (n = 75) and qualitative interviews (n = 20)
performed between September 2015 and August 2016. Participants were tenants of permanent supportive housing in
Brisbane (Qld, Australia). Qualitative data were analysed thematically.
Results. Integrated health care and supportive housing were resources for tenants to overcome systematic barriers to
accessing mainstream health care experienced when homeless. When homeless, people did not have access to resources
required to maintain their health. Homelessness meant not having a voice to influence the health care people received;
healthcare practitioners treated symptoms of poverty rather than considering how homelessness makes people sick.
Integrated healthcare and supportive housing enabled tenants to receive treatment for health problems that were compounded by the barriers to accessing mainstream healthcare that homelessness represented.
Conclusions. Extending the evidence about housing as a social determinant of health, the present study shows that
integrated health care and supportive housing enabled tenants to take control to self-manage their health care. In addition to
homelessness directly contributing to ill health, the present study provides evidence of how the experience of homelessness
contributes to exclusions from mainstream healthcare
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
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Created: Thu, 13 Apr 2017, 06:48:08 EST by Dr Cameron Parsell on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research