Maternal Nutritional Deficiencies and Schizophrenia: Lessons from Animal Models with a Focus on Developmental Vitamin D Deficiency.

Eyles, D.W. and Dean, A.J. (2016). Maternal Nutritional Deficiencies and Schizophrenia: Lessons from Animal Models with a Focus on Developmental Vitamin D Deficiency.. In Mikhail V. Pletnikov and John L. Waddington (Ed.), Modeling the Psychopathological Dimensions of Schizophrenia — From Molecules to Behavior (pp. 243-264) London, United Kingdom: Academic Press (Elsevier Inc). doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-800981-9.00015-8


Author Eyles, D.W.
Dean, A.J.
Title of chapter Maternal Nutritional Deficiencies and Schizophrenia: Lessons from Animal Models with a Focus on Developmental Vitamin D Deficiency.
Title of book Modeling the Psychopathological Dimensions of Schizophrenia — From Molecules to Behavior
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Academic Press (Elsevier Inc)
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Chapter in reference work, encyclopaedia, manual or handbook
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-800981-9.00015-8
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Series Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience
Editor Mikhail V. Pletnikov
John L. Waddington
Chapter number 15
Start page 243
End page 264
Total pages 22
Total chapters 30
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In this chapter, we intend to introduce the reader to the vast amount of research implicating maternal nutritional deficits as risk-modifying factors for the later onset of schizophrenia in offspring. This chapter provides an overview of the more prominent nutritional factors for which there is solid epidemiological or clinical evidence. One major aim is to summarize the research that has investigated the neurobiology of such risk relationships through animal models. This chapter will concentrate on studies modeling one particular developmental risk factor: developmental vitamin D deficiency. This is not intended as a manual to reproduce this model because we have already published this in detail elsewhere. Additionally, it is not intended as a detailed review of how vitamin D signaling could affect brain ontogeny or function as this has also been exhaustively covered. Rather, we bring together the evidence from our work on this particular risk factor that has led to our working hypothesis, suggesting that early alterations in the ontogeny of dopamine pathways could be a convergent mechanism operating within many diverse epidemiologically informed developmental risk factors.
Keyword Dopamine
Folate
Iron
Maternal nutrition
Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)
Vitamin D
Q-Index Code BX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 11 Apr 2017, 13:29:08 EST by Dr Angela Dean on behalf of School of Communication and Arts