Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study

Constantinescu-Sharpe, Gabriella, Phillips, Rebecca L., Davis, Aleisha, Dornan, Dimity and Hogan, Anthony (2017) Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study. BMC Pediatrics, 17 1: . doi:10.1186/s12887-017-0823-y


Author Constantinescu-Sharpe, Gabriella
Phillips, Rebecca L.
Davis, Aleisha
Dornan, Dimity
Hogan, Anthony
Title Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study
Journal name BMC Pediatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2431
Publication date 2017-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s12887-017-0823-y
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 17
Issue 1
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Social inclusion is a common focus of listening and spoken language (LSL) early intervention for children with hearing loss. This exploratory study compared the social inclusion of young children with hearing loss educated using a listening and spoken language approach with population data.

Methods: A framework for understanding the scope of social inclusion is presented in the Background. This framework guided the use of a shortened, modified version of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) to measure two of the five facets of social inclusion ('education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social goals'). The survey was completed by parents of children with hearing loss aged 4-5 years who were educated using a LSL approach (n = 78; 37% who responded). These responses were compared to those obtained for typical hearing children in the LSAC dataset (n = 3265).

Results: Analyses revealed that most children with hearing loss had comparable outcomes to those with typical hearing on the 'education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social roles' facets of social inclusion.

Conclusions: These exploratory findings are positive and warrant further investigation across all five facets of the framework to identify which factors influence social inclusion.
Keyword Children
Hearing loss
Listening and spoken language
Social inclusion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 11 Apr 2017, 00:25:16 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)