Identifying critical habitat for freshwater turtles: integrating long-term monitoring tools to enhance conservation and management

Micheli-Campbell, Mariana A., Connell, Marilyn J., Dwyer, Ross G., Franklin, Craig E., Fry, Brian, Kennard, Mark J., Tao, Juan and Campbell, Hamish A. (2017) Identifying critical habitat for freshwater turtles: integrating long-term monitoring tools to enhance conservation and management. Biodiversity and Conservation, 1-14. doi:10.1007/s10531-017-1325-9


Author Micheli-Campbell, Mariana A.
Connell, Marilyn J.
Dwyer, Ross G.
Franklin, Craig E.
Fry, Brian
Kennard, Mark J.
Tao, Juan
Campbell, Hamish A.
Title Identifying critical habitat for freshwater turtles: integrating long-term monitoring tools to enhance conservation and management
Journal name Biodiversity and Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1572-9710
0960-3115
Publication date 2017-03-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10531-017-1325-9
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The effective conservation and management of threatened species requires comprehensive knowledge about resource utilisation. Here we integrated tissue stable isotope analysis and biotelemetry to identify the predominant dietary resources of two sympatric species of freshwater turtle, and locate where those items were acquired. We deployed an array of underwater acoustic telemetry receivers to autonomously, simultaneously, and continuously, monitor the movements of the threatened Elseya albagula and Elusor macrurus, over a 12-month period. Stable isotope (SI) values (δ13C and δ15N) were measured within the carapace of each species, and compared with SI values within potential food items. The integration of movement information and carapace SI data revealed that whilst these species had overlapping home ranges, there was less than 5% probability of inter-species dietary niche overlap. E. macrurus acquired food items consisting of bivalves, gastropods and aquatic insects within rocky riffles whilst E. albagula fed on filamentous algae and crustaceans foraged from the muddy and vegetated shallow margins of deep water pools. Our findings differ from stomach content analysis and mark-recapture studies, which reported these species to have similar habitat and resource requirements. We argue that the observed disparity is because our methods provided a weighted measure of an individual’s dietary preference and habitat utilisation over a broad time-scale, whilst stomach content analysis and mark-recapture studies offer only a single observation of an individual’s dietary preference. The research demonstrates the utility of integrating passive acoustic telemetry and carapace stable isotope analysis for identifying critical habitat for freshwater turtles.
Keyword Acoustic telemetry
Ecological niche
SIA
Stable isotope analysis
Trophic ecology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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