Extreme adaptations in extreme and chronic circumstances: the application of “weaponized sex” to those exposed to ongoing incestuous abuse

Middleton, Warwick (2017) Extreme adaptations in extreme and chronic circumstances: the application of “weaponized sex” to those exposed to ongoing incestuous abuse. Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 1-20. doi:10.1080/15299732.2017.1295378


Author Middleton, Warwick
Title Extreme adaptations in extreme and chronic circumstances: the application of “weaponized sex” to those exposed to ongoing incestuous abuse
Journal name Journal of Trauma and Dissociation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1529-9740
1529-9732
Publication date 2017-02-28
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15299732.2017.1295378
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract This paper examines Kluft’s construct of “weaponized sex” through the prism of long-term clinical and research involvement with individuals subjected to ongoing sexual abuse during adulthood, a group that by definition has been exposed to more sexual abuse and for longer than any other defined victim population. Examples of the same sort of phenomena described by Kluft are repeatedly observed in therapy with members of this population, but usually not in a dramatic form. As might be anticipated, in order to survive, when an individual is closely attached to a long-term and extreme abuser, the sort of enduring ambivalence carried by the victim towards their primary abuser is manifested in compartmentalized states that wish their abuser dead, while other states in equally compartmentalized ways maintain the attachment via the use of sex—by continuing to be sexually involved with their primary abuser (usually their father), by fantasizing about sex with their abuser, by being sexually involved with those who co-abused with their father, or by staging reenactments with individuals whose sexual behavior re-evokes the abuse by the absent (or deceased) father. The process of healing means that inevitably some manifestations of the responses to such abuse spill over into therapy.
Keyword Adulthood
Dissociative disorders
Incest
Roles and skills
Weaponized sex
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Tue, 11 Apr 2017, 00:25:16 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)