The motivational mechanisms underlying active and high-strain work: consequences for mastery and performance

Parker, Stacey L., Jimmieson, Nerina L. and Amiot, Catherine E. (2017) The motivational mechanisms underlying active and high-strain work: consequences for mastery and performance. Work and Stress, 31 3: 233-255. doi:10.1080/02678373.2017.1303551


Author Parker, Stacey L.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Amiot, Catherine E.
Title The motivational mechanisms underlying active and high-strain work: consequences for mastery and performance
Journal name Work and Stress   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-5335
0267-8373
Publication date 2017-03-24
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02678373.2017.1303551
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 3
Start page 233
End page 255
Total pages 23
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 3202 Applied Psychology
Abstract We test if the motivating potential of active work and the demotivating consequences of high-strain work can be explained by the quality of motivation experienced. Study 1, an experiment (N=205), revealed active work maintained intrinsic motivation and identified regulation (compared to baseline). High-strain work decreased these motivations. Moreover, demand was negatively related to mastery only at low control, through reduced intrinsic motivation. Demand was negatively related to task performance at low control, through reduced identified regulation. Study 2, an online survey (N=516 employees), revealed an energising effect of active work on intrinsic motivation and identified regulation, both of which had positive associations with job performance. A demotivating effect of high-strain work on intrinsic motivation was revealed, which had negative associations with job performance. In conclusion, internalised motivations are important mechanisms, through which active work protects and enhances mastery/performance, and through which high-strain work can deplete these outcomes.
Formatted abstract
We test if the motivating potential of active work and the demotivating consequences of high-strain work can be explained by the “quality” of motivation experienced. Study 1, an experiment (N = 205), revealed active work maintained intrinsic motivation and identified regulation (compared to baseline). High-strain work decreased these motivations. Moreover, demand was negatively related to mastery only at low control, through reduced intrinsic motivation. Demand was negatively related to task performance at low control, through reduced identified regulation. Study 2, an online survey (N = 516 employees), revealed an energising effect of active work on intrinsic motivation and identified regulation, both of which had positive associations with job performance. A demotivating effect of high-strain work on intrinsic motivation was revealed, which had negative associations with job performance. In conclusion, internalised motivations are important mechanisms, through which active work protects and enhances mastery/performance, and through which high-strain work can deplete these outcomes.
Keyword Control
Demand
Mastery
Motivation
Performance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 11 Apr 2017, 00:25:16 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)