Visual deprivation selectively reshapes the intrinsic functional architecture of the anterior insula subregions

Liu, Lihua, Yuan, Congcong, Ding, Hao, Xu, Yongjie, Long, Miaomiao, Li, YanJun, Liu, Yong, Jiang, Tianzi, Qin, Wen, Shen, Wen and Yu, Chunshui (2017) Visual deprivation selectively reshapes the intrinsic functional architecture of the anterior insula subregions. Scientific Reports, 7 . doi:10.1038/srep45675


Author Liu, Lihua
Yuan, Congcong
Ding, Hao
Xu, Yongjie
Long, Miaomiao
Li, YanJun
Liu, Yong
Jiang, Tianzi
Qin, Wen
Shen, Wen
Yu, Chunshui
Title Visual deprivation selectively reshapes the intrinsic functional architecture of the anterior insula subregions
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2017-03-30
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep45675
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract The anterior insula (AI) is the core hub of salience network that serves to identify the most relevant stimuli among vast sensory inputs and forward them to higher cognitive regions to guide behaviour. As blind subjects were usually reported with changed perceptive abilities for salient non-visual stimuli, we hypothesized that the resting-state functional network of the AI is selectively reorganized after visual deprivation. The resting-state functional connectivity (FC) of the bilateral dorsal and ventral AI was calculated for twenty congenitally blind (CB), 27 early blind (EB), 44 late blind (LB) individuals and 50 sighted controls (SCs). The FCs of the dorsal AI were strengthened with the dorsal visual stream, while weakened with the ventral visual stream in the blind than the SCs; in contrast, the FCs of the ventral AI of the blind was strengthened with the ventral visual stream. Furthermore, these strengthened FCs of both the dorsal and ventral AI were partially negatively associated with the onset age of blindness. Our result indicates two parallel pathways that selectively transfer non-visual salient information between the deprived "visual" cortex and salience network in blind subjects.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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