Cross-comparison of human wastewater-associated molecular markers in relation to fecal indicator bacteria and enteric viruses in recreational beach waters

Hughes, B., Beale, D. J., Dennis, P. G., Cook, S. and Ahmed, W. (2017) Cross-comparison of human wastewater-associated molecular markers in relation to fecal indicator bacteria and enteric viruses in recreational beach waters. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 83 8: . doi:10.1128/AEM.00028-17

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ547418_OA.pdf application/pdf 1.22MB 0

Author Hughes, B.
Beale, D. J.
Dennis, P. G.
Cook, S.
Ahmed, W.
Title Cross-comparison of human wastewater-associated molecular markers in relation to fecal indicator bacteria and enteric viruses in recreational beach waters
Journal name Applied and Environmental Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1098-5336
0099-2240
Publication date 2017-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/AEM.00028-17
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 83
Issue 8
Total pages 16
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Detection of human wastewater contamination in recreational waters is of critical importance to regulators due to the risks posed to public health. To identify such risks, human wastewater-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers have been developed. At present, however, a greater understanding of the suitability of these markers for the detection of diluted human wastewater in environmental waters is necessary to predict risk. Here, we compared the process limit of detection (PLOD) and process limit of quantification (PLOQ) of six human wastewater-associated MST markers (Bacteroides HF183 [HF183], Escherichia coli H8 [EC H8], Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH, human adenovirus [HAdV], human polyomavirus [HPyV], and pepper mild mottle virus [PMMoV]) in relation to a fecal indicator bacterium (FIB), Enterococcus sp. 23S rRNA (ENT 23S), and three enteric viruses (human adenovirus serotypes 40/41 [HAdV 40/41], human norovirus [HNoV], and human enterovirus [EV]) in beach water samples seeded with raw and secondary-treated wastewater. Among the six MST markers tested, HF183 was the most sensitive measure of human fecal pollution and was quantifiable up to dilutions of 10-6 and 10-4 for beach water samples seeded with raw and secondary-treated wastewater, respectively. Other markers and enteric viruses were detected at various dilutions (10-1 to 10-5). These MST markers, FIB, and enteric viruses were then quantified in beach water (n=12) and sand samples (n=12) from South East Queensland (SEQ), Australia, to estimate the levels of human fecal pollution. Of the 12 sites examined, beach water and sand samples from several sites had quantifiable concentrations of HF183 and PMMoV markers. Overall, our results indicate that while HF183 is the most sensitive measure of human fecal pollution, it should be used in conjunction with a conferring viral marker to avoid overestimating the risk of gastrointestinal illness.

Importance: MST is an effective tool to help utilities and regulators improve recreational water quality around the globe. Human fecal pollution poses significant public health risks compared to animal fecal pollution. Several human wastewater associated markers have been developed and used for MST field studies. However, a head-to-head comparison in terms of their performance to detect diluted human fecal pollution in recreational water is lacking. In this study, we cross-compared the performance of six human wastewater-associated markers in relation to FIB and enteric viruses in beach water samples seeded with raw and secondary-treated wastewater. The results of this study will provide guidance to regulators and utilities on the appropriate application of MST markers for tracking the sources of human fecal pollution in environmental waters and confer human health risks.
Keyword Beach water
Enteric viruses
Fecal indicator bacteria
Human wastewater
Microbial source tracking
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 11 Apr 2017, 00:25:16 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)