Accuracy of young male drivers’ self-assessments of driving skill

Martinussen, Laila M., Moller, Mette and Prato, Carlo G. (2017) Accuracy of young male drivers’ self-assessments of driving skill. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 46 228-235. doi:10.1016/j.trf.2017.03.001


Author Martinussen, Laila M.
Moller, Mette
Prato, Carlo G.
Title Accuracy of young male drivers’ self-assessments of driving skill
Journal name Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1369-8478
1873-5517
Publication date 2017-04-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2017.03.001
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 46
Start page 228
End page 235
Total pages 8
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Accurate self-assessment of skill is important because it creates an appropriate level of confidence and hence behaviour. Inaccurate self-assessment of driving ability has been linked to reckless driving and accidents. Inaccurate self-assessment of driving skills may be a contributing factor to the over-representation of young male drivers in accident statistics. Most previous research on self-assessment of driving skills did not compare self-reported skills to objectively measured driving skills, so the aims of this study were: (1) to test the accuracy of young male drivers’ self-assessments of specific driving skills by comparing them with performance in a driving simulator; (2) to test whether self-assessment accuracy varied with driving skill, driving experience and sensation-seeking propensity. We found that young male drivers’ self-assessments were inconsistent with their driving performance, and that this inconsistency varied with driving skill, driving experience and sensation-seeking propensity. Groups with particularly inaccurate self-assessments are at high risk, because of their relative lack of skill, high mileage and sensation-seeking propensity. Self-assessments of hazard prediction and detection skills were particularly inaccurate. Understanding self-assessments of driving skill is crucial, but further studies are needed to allow preventive policies and interventions to take factors affecting self-assessments into account.
Keyword Self-assessed driving skills
Driving skills
Driving experience
Sensation seeking
Driving simulator
Young male drivers
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
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Created: Tue, 11 Apr 2017, 00:25:16 EST by Web Cron on behalf of School of Civil Engineering