Perception matrices: an adaptation of repertory grid technique

Moon, Katie, Blackman, Deborah A., Adams, Vanessa M. and Kool, Johnathan (2017) Perception matrices: an adaptation of repertory grid technique. Land Use Policy, 64 451-460. doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.2017.03.023


Author Moon, Katie
Blackman, Deborah A.
Adams, Vanessa M.
Kool, Johnathan
Title Perception matrices: an adaptation of repertory grid technique
Journal name Land Use Policy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-8377
1873-5754
Publication date 2017-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.landusepol.2017.03.023
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 64
Start page 451
End page 460
Total pages 10
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Perceptions of stakeholders can influence who is included and excluded from environmental policy-making processes. Repertory grid technique is a qualitative method that captures how a person differentiates objects according to dimensions of similarity. Used in a qualitative way, repertory grids reflect a person's individual constructed reality of the world. We adapt the technique to create a quantitative perception matrix that offers research participants the same set of stakeholder groups and descriptors that, unlike qualitative applications, can be used to compare perceptions between decision-makers to understand and predict preferences for stakeholder inclusion. Eight senior policy advisors and six scientists who were involved in developing fox eradication policies in Tasmania, Australia, completed a perception matrix with a supplied set of stakeholder groups (i.e. repertory grid elements, e.g. government, media, general community) and descriptors (i.e. repertory grid constructs, e.g. credibility, effectiveness, influence). They rated each stakeholder group against each descriptor. The results show that different groups of stakeholders were rated similarly to each other, for example, scientific experts and government departments were rated similarly between participants, and were considered more credible and effective than the general community and the media. The results also show that sets of descriptors were used to describe stakeholders, for instance if a stakeholder was perceived to be credible, they also tended to be perceived as effective. Differences between policy advisors and scientists revealed opportunities to explore functional roles of stakeholders, where stakeholders are considered in terms of what they can offer to the decision making process, rather than who they are. Our adaptation of repertory grid technique, with supplied elements and constructs, demonstrates the usefulness of perception matrices in enabling statistical comparison of implicit perceptions; identifying similarity and variability among individuals’ perceptions of stakeholders; and providing a visual representation of the structure of perceptions of groups of individuals.
Keyword Australia
Environmental policy
Epistemology
Invasive species
Perceptions
Social science
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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