Sitting time, physical activity and sleep by work type and pattern – the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

Clark, Bronwyn K. , Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L. , Duncan, Mitch J. and Brown, Wendy (2017) Sitting time, physical activity and sleep by work type and pattern – the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 3: . doi:10.3390/ijerph14030290


Author Clark, Bronwyn K.
Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L.
Duncan, Mitch J.
Brown, Wendy
Title Sitting time, physical activity and sleep by work type and pattern – the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1660-4601
1661-7827
Publication date 2017-03-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14030290
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 14
Issue 3
Total pages 15
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher MDPI
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health were used to examine how work was associated with time spent sleeping, sitting and in physical activity (PA), in working women. Young (31–36 years; 2009) and mid-aged (59–64 years; 2010) women reported sleep (categorised as shorter ≤6 h/day and longer ≥8 h/day) and sitting time (work, transport, television, non-work computer, and other; summed for total sitting time) on the most recent work and non-work day; and moderate and vigorous PA (categorised as meeting/not meeting guidelines) in the previous week. Participants reported occupation (manager/professional; clerical/sales; trades/transport/labourer), work hours (part-time; full-time) and work pattern (shift/night; not shift/night). The odds of shorter sleep on work days was higher in both cohorts for women who worked shift or night hours. Longer sitting time on work days, made up primarily of sitting for work, was found for managers/professionals, clerical/sales and full-time workers. In the young cohort, clerical/sales workers and in the mid-aged cohort, full-time workers were less likely to meet PA guidelines. These results suggest multiple behaviour interventions tailored to work patterns and occupational category may be useful to improve the sleep, sitting and activity of working women.
Keyword Sleep
Sitting
Physical activity
Women
Work
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes This article belongs to the Special Issue Women’s Health and the Work Environment

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 07 Apr 2017, 15:08:13 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences