Belowground carbon allocation patterns as determined by the in-growth soil core 13C technique across different ecosystem types

Martinez, Cristina, Alberti, Giorgio, Cotrufo, M. Francesca, Magnani, Federico, Zanotelli, Damiano, Camin, Federica, Gianelle, Damiano, Cescatti, Alessandro and Rodeghiero, Mirco (2016) Belowground carbon allocation patterns as determined by the in-growth soil core 13C technique across different ecosystem types. Geoderma, 263 140-150. doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.08.043


Author Martinez, Cristina
Alberti, Giorgio
Cotrufo, M. Francesca
Magnani, Federico
Zanotelli, Damiano
Camin, Federica
Gianelle, Damiano
Cescatti, Alessandro
Rodeghiero, Mirco
Title Belowground carbon allocation patterns as determined by the in-growth soil core 13C technique across different ecosystem types
Formatted title
Belowground carbon allocation patterns as determined by the in-growth soil core 13C technique across different ecosystem types
Journal name Geoderma   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0016-7061
1872-6259
Publication date 2016-02-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.08.043
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 263
Start page 140
End page 150
Total pages 11
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Belowground carbon inputs, in particular rhizodeposition, are a key component of the global carbon cycle and yet their accurate quantification remains a major challenge. In the present paper, the in-growth soil cores-13C method was used to quantify net root carbon input (root-derived C). Four different ecosystem types (forest, alpine grassland, apple orchard and vineyard) in northern Italy, characterized by C3 vegetation with a broad range of aboveground net primary production (ANPP; 155-770gCm-2y-1) were investigated. Cores, filled with soil of a known C4 isotopic signature were inserted at each site for twelve months. After extraction, root-derived C was quantified by applying a mass balance equation. Gross primary production (GPP) was determined by eddy covariance whereas ANPP was quantified using a biometric approach.

NPP partitioning among sites differed, with fruit production dominating at agricultural sites. At these sites, belowground C inputs were dominated by rhizodeposits, likely due to relatively high root turnover. In natural ecosystems (forest and grassland) fine root production dominated belowground net primary production (BNPP) likely due to higher root growth determined by low phosphorus availability. Root derived C represented a significant contribution to BNPP varying from 40 to 60%. Our results underline the fact that failure to account for rhizodeposits may lead to a significant underestimation of BNPP.
Keyword Carbon partitioning
In-growth cores
Net root carbon input
Rhizodeposition
Stable isotopes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 05 Apr 2017, 01:00:45 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)