Physiotherapy intervention for positional plagiocephaly at an Australian community health facility

Leung, Amy (2009). Physiotherapy intervention for positional plagiocephaly at an Australian community health facility. In: APA Conference Week 2009, Sydney, Australia, (). 1-5 October 2009.

Author Leung, Amy
Title of paper Physiotherapy intervention for positional plagiocephaly at an Australian community health facility
Conference name APA Conference Week 2009
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 1-5 October 2009
Journal name The e-Australian Journal of Physiotherapy
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Other
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The aim of this study is to explore the outcomes of infants with positional plagiocephaly referred for physiotherapy at an Australian community health centre. A retrospective study using a total cohort convenience sample was conducted. Of 156 infants with positional plagiocephaly referred for physiotherapy from 2004–2007, 25 were excluded (23 not contactable, 1 diagnosed with cerebral palsy, and 1 with parent not concerned). Data were retrieved from their community health records. Eighty percent of the infants were referred by child health nurses who also educated the parents about re-positioning strategies. There was an association of more limited active neck rotation in those with more severe plagiocephaly (p = 0.066). Nearly 85% of mothers reported that they complied with the physiotherapy home program. Mean number of physiotherapy sessions was 2.27 +/- 1.6 and length of intervention was 9.17 +/- 8.48 weeks. Significant reduction in the severity of plagiocephaly as measured by cranial vault asymmetry index (p < 0.001) and clinical presentation (p < 0.001) was noted after physiotherapy intervention. The severity of the plagiocephaly did not correlate with the severity of clinical presentation, age appropriate developmental milestones, the number of physiotherapy sessions or the total length of physiotherapy service received. Sixty-eight percent of infants were discharged with optimal results and only 3 infants needed referral for helmet therapy. In infants with positional plagiocephaly, physiotherapy intervention can be focused on individualised repositioning strategies which will facilitate parents’ compliance to implement the strategies and lead to improved infant head shape.
Q-Index Code EX
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Relevance: 38.023647

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 02 Apr 2017, 06:43:17 EST by Amy Leung on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences