Understanding patient access patterns for primary health-care services for Aboriginal and Islander people in Queensland: a geospatial mapping approach

Panaretto, K. S., Dellit, A., Hollins, A., Wason, G., Sidhom, C., Chilcott, K., Malthouse, D., Andrews, S., Mein, J., Ahkee, B. and McDermott, R. (2017) Understanding patient access patterns for primary health-care services for Aboriginal and Islander people in Queensland: a geospatial mapping approach. Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23 1: 37-45. doi:10.1071/PY15115


Author Panaretto, K. S.
Dellit, A.
Hollins, A.
Wason, G.
Sidhom, C.
Chilcott, K.
Malthouse, D.
Andrews, S.
Mein, J.
Ahkee, B.
McDermott, R.
Title Understanding patient access patterns for primary health-care services for Aboriginal and Islander people in Queensland: a geospatial mapping approach
Journal name Australian Journal of Primary Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1836-7399
1448-7527
Publication date 2017-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/PY15115
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 23
Issue 1
Start page 37
End page 45
Total pages 9
Place of publication Clayton, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract This paperexplores the patterns ofpatients'accessingsix Aboriginal and Islander CommunityControlled Health Services (AICCHSs) in Queensland. Between August 2011 and February 2014, 26199 patients made at least one visit over a 2-year period prior to at least one of six Queensland AICCHS-one urban service (RA 1) in south-east Queensland, and five services in regional towns (RA 3) in Far North Queensland. Geospatial mapping of addresses for these registered patients was undertaken. The outcomes analysed included travel times to, the proportion of catchment populations using each AICCHS and an assessment of alternative mainstream general practice availability to these patients was made. In brief, the use of AICCHS was higher than Australian Bureau of Statistics census data would suggest. Approximately 20% of clients travel more than 30min to seek Aboriginal Health services, but only 8% of patients travelled longer than 60min. In the major city site, many other general practitioner (GP) services were bypassed. The data suggest Aboriginal and Islander patients in Queensland appear to value community-controlled primary care services. The number of Indigenous clients in regional locations in the Far North Queensland registered with services is often higher than the estimated resident population numbers.
Keyword Community-controlled primary health care
Indigenous
Travel times
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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