Conservation benefits of tropical multifunctional land-uses in and around a forest protected area of Bangladesh

Mukul, Sharif A. and Saha, Narayan (2017) Conservation benefits of tropical multifunctional land-uses in and around a forest protected area of Bangladesh. Land, 6 1: . doi:10.3390/land6010002


Author Mukul, Sharif A.
Saha, Narayan
Title Conservation benefits of tropical multifunctional land-uses in and around a forest protected area of Bangladesh
Journal name Land   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2073-445X
Publication date 2017-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3390/land6010002
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 1
Total pages 12
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher MDPI
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Competing interests in land for agriculture and commodity production in tropical human-dominated landscapes make forests and biodiversity conservation particularly challenging.
Establishment of protected areas in this regard is not functioning as expected due to exclusive ecological focus and poor recognition of local people’s traditional forest use and dependence. In recent years, multifunctional land-use systems such as agroforestry have widely been promoted as an efficient land-use in such circumstances, although their conservation effectiveness remains poorly investigated. We undertake a rapid biodiversity survey to understand the conservation value of four contrasting forms of local land-use, namely: betel leaf (Piper betle) agroforestry; lemon (Citrus limon) agroforestry; pineapple (Ananas comosus) agroforestry; and, shifting cultivation–fallow managed largely by the indigenous communities in and around a highly diverse forest protected area of Bangladesh. We measure the alpha and beta diversity of plants, birds, and mammals in these multifunctional land-uses, as well as in the old-growth secondary forest in the area. Our study finds local land-use critical in conserving biodiversity in the area, with comparable biodiversity benefits as those of the old-growth secondary forest. In Bangladesh, where population pressure and rural people’s dependence on forests are common, multifunctional land-uses in areas of high conservation priority could potentially be used to bridge the gap between conservation and commodity production, ensuring that the ecological integrity of such landscapes will be altered as little as possible.
Keyword Biodiversity conservation
Agroforestry
Traditional land-use
Land-sparing
Land-sharing
Wildlife
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Thu, 30 Mar 2017, 14:50:27 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)