Holocene ecosystem change in Little Llangothlin Lagoon, Australia: implications for the management of a Ramsar-listed wetland

Woodward, Craig , Shulmeister, James, Zawadzki, Atun , Child, David , Barry, Linda and Hotchkis, Michael (2017) Holocene ecosystem change in Little Llangothlin Lagoon, Australia: implications for the management of a Ramsar-listed wetland. Hydrobiologia, 785 1: 337-358. doi:10.1007/s10750-016-2942-0


Author Woodward, Craig
Shulmeister, James
Zawadzki, Atun
Child, David
Barry, Linda
Hotchkis, Michael
Title Holocene ecosystem change in Little Llangothlin Lagoon, Australia: implications for the management of a Ramsar-listed wetland
Journal name Hydrobiologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0018-8158
1573-5117
Publication date 2017-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10750-016-2942-0
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 785
Issue 1
Start page 337
End page 358
Total pages 22
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We present new chironomid and stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) data from Little Llangothlin Lagoon, Australia that provides more detail on changes in this wetland since European settlement ca. 1840 AD. We also examine how the updated Holocene paleoecological record provides insights for management of this Ramsar-listed wetland. The current management strategy for Little Llangothlin is to restore the wetland and catchment to its natural state. This strategy is intended to protect the values that allowed it to be listed as a Ramsar wetland; i.e. its role as a drought refuge for waterbirds and to preserve or enhance threatened ecological communities. There are clear conflicts between the Ramsar listing criteria, management objectives and the management strategy in light of information provided by the palaeoecological record. In particular, restoration of terrestrial ecosystems through reforestation may jeopardise the wetlands role as a drought refuge. Some activities, such as artificial raising of the water level in 1989 are intended to restore, but actually introduced a state that did not exist prior to human settlement. We recommend a more integrated management approach that heeds the information provided by the palaeoecological record and focuses more on maintenance or enhancement of ecosystem services and biodiversity.
Keyword Wetland
Management
Ramsar
Australia
Paleoecology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
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Created: Wed, 29 Mar 2017, 11:12:51 EST by Yukie Tamura on behalf of School of Earth and Environmental Sciences