CO2-vegetation feedbacks and other climate changes implicated in reducing base flow

Trancoso, Ralph, Larsen, Joshua R., Mcvicar, Tim R., Phinn, Stuart R. and Mcalpine, Clive A. (2017) CO2-vegetation feedbacks and other climate changes implicated in reducing base flow. Geophysical Research Letters, 44 5: 2310-2318. doi:10.1002/2017GL072759


Author Trancoso, Ralph
Larsen, Joshua R.
Mcvicar, Tim R.
Phinn, Stuart R.
Mcalpine, Clive A.
Title CO2-vegetation feedbacks and other climate changes implicated in reducing base flow
Formatted title
CO2-vegetation feedbacks and other climate changes implicated in reducing base flow
Journal name Geophysical Research Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1944-8007
0094-8276
Publication date 2017-03-16
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/2017GL072759
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 5
Start page 2310
End page 2318
Total pages 9
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Changes in the hydrological cycle have a significant impact in water limited environments. Globally, some of these regions are experiencing declining precipitation yet are simultaneously becoming greener, partly due to vegetation feedbacks associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Reduced precipitation together with increasing rates of actual evapotranspiration diminishes streamflow, especially base flow, a critical freshwater dry-season resource. Here we assess recent changes in base flow in Australia from 1981-2013 and 1950-2013 and separate the contribution of precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, and other factors on base flow trends. Our findings reveal that these other factors influencing the base flow trends are best explained by an increase in photosynthetic activity. These results provide the first robust observational evidence that increasing atmospheric CO2 and its associated vegetation feedbacks are reducing base flow in addition to other climatic impacts. These findings have broad implications for water resource management, especially in the world's water limited regions.
Keyword Base flow
Climate change
CO2 fertilization
Elevated atmospheric CO2
Trends
Vegetation feedbacks
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
 
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