A wearable device with inertial motion tracking and vibro-tactile feedback for aesthetic sport athletes: diving coach monitor

Kidman, Emma M., D'Souza, Matthew J. A. and Singh, Surya P. N. (2017). A wearable device with inertial motion tracking and vibro-tactile feedback for aesthetic sport athletes: diving coach monitor. In: 2016, 10th International Conference on Signal Processing and Communication Systems, ICSPCS 2016 - Proceedings. 10th International Conference on Signal Processing and Communication Systems, ICSPCS 2016, Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia, (). 19 - 21 December 2016. doi:10.1109/ICSPCS.2016.7843371


Author Kidman, Emma M.
D'Souza, Matthew J. A.
Singh, Surya P. N.
Title of paper A wearable device with inertial motion tracking and vibro-tactile feedback for aesthetic sport athletes: diving coach monitor
Conference name 10th International Conference on Signal Processing and Communication Systems, ICSPCS 2016
Conference location Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 19 - 21 December 2016
Convener IEEE
Proceedings title 2016, 10th International Conference on Signal Processing and Communication Systems, ICSPCS 2016 - Proceedings
Place of Publication Piscataway, NJ, United States
Publisher Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Publication Year 2017
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1109/ICSPCS.2016.7843371
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISBN 9781509009411
9781509009404
9781509009428
Total pages 6
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Research into the kinematic training of elite divers shows a demand for diver training using biomechanical feedback. With suitable inertial data and tactile feedback, divers and their coaches could better understand their dives and failure modes. This would help improve technique and reduce fatigue during both training and competition, resulting in higher quality dives. We developed the Diving Coach Monitor (DCM) that can wire-lessly stream inertial data to an assistant as well as vibrotactially signal an athlete during a dive. The DCM is comprised of a wearable sensor module, worn by a diver and a smartphone application for the diver's coach. The diver's coach uses the smartphone application to signal the wearable sensor module, throughout the training session. The wearable sensor module receives the control commands and acts accordingly with one of the following actions: vibrate (to signal the diver); commence inertial data sampling; stop inertial data sampling and transmit data back to the smartphone application. While the DCM is water-proof, we trialled the DCM in a 'dry-land' environment, as divers often train with trampoline spotting rigs and (occasionally) a safety harness. We also conducted multiple trial sessions with circus and gymnastic aerial apparatus and athletes. Our tests showed accurate measurement and low latency compared to video motion analysis.
Keyword Wearable sensors
Wireless sensor network biomechanical sensing
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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