Late talkers and later language outcomes: Predicting the different language trajectories

Armstrong, Rebecca, Scott, James G., Whitehouse, Andrew J. O., Copland, David A., McMahon, Katie L. and Arnott, Wendy (2017) Late talkers and later language outcomes: Predicting the different language trajectories. International Journal of Speech Language Pathology, 1-14. doi:10.1080/17549507.2017.1296191


Author Armstrong, Rebecca
Scott, James G.
Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.
Copland, David A.
McMahon, Katie L.
Arnott, Wendy
Title Late talkers and later language outcomes: Predicting the different language trajectories
Journal name International Journal of Speech Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1754-9507
1754-9515
Publication date 2017-04-25
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/17549507.2017.1296191
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The aim of the current study was to investigate the risk factors present at 2 years for children who showed language difficulties that persisted from 2 to 10 years and difficulties that emerged later, at 10 years.

Method: Participants (n = 783) were drawn from the Raine Study in Western Australia. Patterns of change from 2 to 10 years were identified based on child performance on the Language Development Survey and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, respectively. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to test whether parental, family and child characteristics present at 2 years predicted poorer language outcomes at age 10.

Result: Across the 8 year period, 5.6% of the children displayed consistently low language skills, 5.9% improved skills and 23.2% deteriorated skills. Compared to children with consistently typical skills, the deteriorated group was more likely to have mothers who smoked during pregnancy, fathers with incomplete secondary education, low family income, poor early literacy environment and be male. Children showing consistently low language skills were more likely to have mothers who smoked during pregnancy than late talkers whose early delays improved.

Conclusion: Results provide evidence of some modifiable risk factors at 2 years which are associated with language outcome.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 27 Mar 2017, 17:18:49 EST by Lorine Wilkinson on behalf of Centre for Advanced Imaging