Toward a comprehensive understanding of intergroup contact: descriptions and mediators of positive and negative contact among majority and minority groups

Hayward, Lydia E., Tropp, Linda R., Hornsey, Matthew J. and Barlow, Fiona Kate (2017) Toward a comprehensive understanding of intergroup contact: descriptions and mediators of positive and negative contact among majority and minority groups. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 43 3: 347-364. doi:10.1177/0146167216685291

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Author Hayward, Lydia E.
Tropp, Linda R.
Hornsey, Matthew J.
Barlow, Fiona Kate
Title Toward a comprehensive understanding of intergroup contact: descriptions and mediators of positive and negative contact among majority and minority groups
Journal name Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0146-1672
1552-7433
Publication date 2017-03-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0146167216685291
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 43
Issue 3
Start page 347
End page 364
Total pages 18
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Positive contact predicts reduced prejudice, but negative contact may increase prejudice at a stronger rate. The current project builds on this work in four ways: establishing an understanding of contact that is grounded in subjective experience, examining the affective mediators involved in the negative contact–prejudice relationship, extending research on the effects of positive and negative contact to minority groups, and examining the contact asymmetry experimentally. Study 1 introduced anger as a mediator of the relationships between positive and negative contact and prejudice among White Americans (N = 371), using a contact measure that reflected the frequency and intensity of a wide range of experiences. Study 2 found a contact asymmetry among Black and Hispanic Americans (N = 365). Study 3 found initial experimental evidence of a contact asymmetry (N = 309). We conclude by calling for a more nuanced understanding of intergroup contact that recognizes its multifaceted and subjective nature.
Keyword Intergroup contact
Prejudice
Intergroup emotions
Negative contact
Minority groups
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Sun, 26 Mar 2017, 01:00:51 EST by Web Cron on behalf of School of Psychology