The potential distribution of cassava mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti), a threat to food security for the poor

Yonow, Tania, Kriticos, Darren J. and Ota, Noboru (2017) The potential distribution of cassava mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti), a threat to food security for the poor. PLoS One, 12 3: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0173265


Author Yonow, Tania
Kriticos, Darren J.
Ota, Noboru
Title The potential distribution of cassava mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti), a threat to food security for the poor
Formatted title
The potential distribution of cassava mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti), a threat to food security for the poor
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2017-03-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0173265
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 12
Issue 3
Total pages 16
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract The cassava mealybug is a clear and present threat to the food security and livelihoods of some of the world's most impoverished citizens. Niche models, such as CLIMEX, are useful tools to indicate where and when such threats may extend, and can assist with planning for biosecurity and the management of pest invasions. They can also contribute to bioeconomic analyses that underpin the allocation of resources to alleviate poverty. Because species can invade and establish in areas with climates that are different from those that are found in their native range, it is essential to define robust range-limiting mechanisms in niche models. To avoid spurious results when applied to novel climates, it is necessary to employ crossvalidation techniques spanning different knowledge domains (e.g., distribution data, experimental results, phenological observations). We build upon and update a CLIMEX niche model by Parsa et al. (PloS ONE 7: e47675), correcting inconsistent parameters and re-fitting it based on a careful examination of geographical distribution data and relevant literature. Further, we consider the role of irrigation, the known distribution of cassava production and a targeted review of satellite imagery to refine, validate and interpret our model and results. In so doing, we bring new insights into the potential spread of this invasive insect, enabling us to identify potential bio-security threats and biological control opportunities. The fit of the revised model is improved, particularly in relation to the wet and dry limits to establishment, and the parameter values are biologically plausible and accord with published scientific literature.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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