The impact of crosstalk on three-dimensional laparoscopic performance and workload

Sakata, Shinichiro , Grove, Philip M. , Watson, Marcus O.  and Stevenson, Andrew R. L.  (2017) The impact of crosstalk on three-dimensional laparoscopic performance and workload. Surgical Endoscopy, 31 10: 1-7. doi:10.1007/s00464-017-5449-5


Author Sakata, Shinichiro
Grove, Philip M. 
Watson, Marcus O. 
Stevenson, Andrew R. L. 
Title The impact of crosstalk on three-dimensional laparoscopic performance and workload
Journal name Surgical Endoscopy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0930-2794
1432-2218
Publication date 2017-03-09
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00464-017-5449-5
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 10
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject 2746 Surgery
Abstract This is the first study to explore the effects of crosstalk from 3D laparoscopic displays on technical performance and workload. We studied crosstalk at magnitudes that may have been tolerated during laparoscopic surgery. Participants were 36 voluntary doctors. To minimize floor effects, participants completed their surgery rotations, and a laparoscopic suturing course for surgical trainees. We used a counterbalanced, within-subjects design in which participants were randomly assigned to complete laparoscopic tasks in one of six unique testing sequences. In a simulation laboratory, participants were randomly assigned to complete laparoscopic ‘navigation in space’ and suturing tasks in three viewing conditions: 2D, 3D without ghosting and 3D with ghosting. Participants calibrated their exposure to crosstalk as the maximum level of ghosting that they could tolerate without discomfort. The Randot® Stereotest was used to verify stereoacuity. The study performance metric was time to completion. The NASA TLX was used to measure workload. Normal threshold stereoacuity (40-20 second of arc) was verified in all participants. Comparing optimal 3D with 2D viewing conditions, mean performance times were 2.8 and 1.6 times faster in laparoscopic navigation in space and suturing tasks respectively (p< .001). Comparing optimal 3D with suboptimal 3D viewing conditions, mean performance times were 2.9 times faster in both tasks (p< .001). Mean workload in 2D was 1.5 and 1.3 times greater than in optimal 3D viewing, for navigation in space and suturing tasks respectively (p< .001). Mean workload associated with suboptimal 3D was 1.3 times greater than optimal 3D in both laparoscopic tasks (p< .001). There was no significant relationship between the magnitude of ghosting score, laparoscopic performance and workload. Our findings highlight the advantages of 3D displays when used optimally, and their shortcomings when used sub-optimally, on both laparoscopic performance and workload.
Keyword 2D
3D
Two-dimensional
Three-dimensional
Laparoscopy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 9 March 2017. Article in Press.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Tue, 21 Mar 2017, 10:26:35 EST by Shinichiro Sakata on behalf of Faculty of Medicine